Learning to live with the “new normal” … or avoid it if you can

Very, very, very slowly it appears that we are starting to see some serious interest in research into the psychosocial impact of prostate cancer and its treatment on men and their close family members and/or intimate partners. … READ MORE …

Baseline data from the ProtecT trial … with outcomes still to come

Many readers of this blog will be interested to look through the data on the preliminary study design and diagnostic and baseline results of the randomized, phase III ProtecT trial that have just been reported in The Lancet Oncology. … READ MORE …

Of risk and reality — the role of prostate cancer testing in young, high-risk patients

None of the trials conducted to date have provided sound information as to the risk and benefits associated with PSA testing among younger men (aged, say, between 35 and 50 years of age) who have well-known risk factors for prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Results of repeat biopsies under electronically tracked, MRI/TRUS fusion guidance

Dr. Leonard Marks and colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles were among the earliest groups to start to use and publish data on MRI/TRUS fusion biopsies of the prostate. They have now reported some early data on repeat biopsies using such methodology in men on active surveillance. … READ MORE …

Results of the RADAR trial at 7.4 years of follow-up

The RADAR trial (also known as TROG 03.04) was a randomized trial of 6 months of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) + radiation therapy versus 18 months of ADT + radiotherapy, with or without additional zoledronic acid therapy, in men with intermediate- and high-risk, locally advanced prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

To quest and test (or not to quest at all)

On The New York Times‘s “Well” blog site today. Dr. Barak Gaster takes on the complex issue of how doctors need to get better at talking to patients about the pros and cons of PSA testing. And there very definitely are pros and cons! I kid you not.

Your acne’s not preventing your risk for prostate cancer

Even though we don’t remember ever coming across this suggestion before, a few studies have apparently suggested that having acne is associated with a decreased risk for a diagnosis of prostate cancer — and aggressive forms of prostate cancer in particular. … READ MORE …

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,133 other followers