Neoadjuvant ADT prior to radical surgery in high-risk prostate cancer patients

A group of South Korean researchers have just reported data on the prevalence and outcomes of pT0 disease after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radical prostatectomy among men receiving first-line therapy for high-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Can Cytori Cell Therapy change the way we treat long-term male incontinence post-surgery?

What is described as an open-label, multi-center, single -arm study (the ADRESU trial) has opened in Japan to evaluate the efficacy and safety of periurethral injection of autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) for the treatment of male stress urinary incontinence resulting from radical prostatectomy (or from transurethral resction of the prostate). … READ MORE …

What percentage of prostate cancer patients are really good candidates for active surveillance?

In addition to the new data from Johns Hopkins, reported earlier this week, that were highly supportive of active surveillance as a first-line management strategy for “favorable-risk” prostate cancer, another recent study has suggested that as many as 67 percent of newly diagnosed patients may be good candidates for such first-line management. … READ MORE …

When should the catheter come out after a radical prostatectomy?

One of the biggest concerns for men diagnosed with prostate cancer, when making decisions about treatment for localized disease, is the risk for long-term incontinence. Many factors can affect this risk, and an important one is the quality of physiological recovery and tissue repair post-surgery. … READ MORE …

Introducing PCPC3

The following statement was issued this morning by a new, patient-centric group of prostate cancer education, advocacy, and support organizations here in the USA. As indicated below, Prostate Cancer International — the parent organization behind The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink is a founder member of the new group. … READ MORE …

New data from Johns Hopkins on outcomes after active surveillance

A new article from the group at Johns Hopkins has now confirmed that rates of prostate cancer-specific mortality and progression to metastatic disease are extremely low at 15 years of follow-up in their 18-year-long active surveillance cohort. … READ MORE …

The expanding role of active surveillance in urology

It is fascinating to see that, as urologists have begun to understand and accept the viability and value of active surveillance (“expectant management”) in management of prostate cancer, they are beginning to see other uses for this strategy too. … READ MORE …

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