Prostvac Phase III trial results in mCRPC “by early 2017″

According to a Reuters report issued early this morning, the CEO of Barvarian Nordic has stated publicly that the company expects results of Phase III trials of Prostvac VF in men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) by early 2017 or perhaps earlier. … READ MORE …

Prostvac + ipilimumab shows promise in management of mCRPC

Results from a small trial of Barvarian Nordic’s investigational drug Prostvac — used in combination with Bristol-Myers Squibb’s ipilimumab (Yervoy) — appear to have shown relatively dramatic effects in the treatment of men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). … READ MORE …

In 2004-07 most Medicare-eligible men were getting radiation therapy for first-line treatment of prostate cancer

In a second article in the new journal JAMA Oncology, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles suggest that 58 percent of all relatively recent treatment for prostate cancer was being given by radiation therapy of some type, and that indolent prostate cancer was being significantly over-treated. … READ MORE …

SBRT for high-risk prostate cancer

Treatments for high-risk prostate cancer are limited. Surgery is usually considered a poor option if the cancer has already escaped the prostate capsule (stage T3/4). External beam radiation is often given with hormone therapy for high grade cancers, or with a brachytherapy boost. … READ MORE …

IADT, dutasteride, and the AVIAS trial — not the result some would want to hear

So the initial results of the AVIAS trial are not going to make a couple of our regular readers too happy — although at least a trial of the type they have been asking for has now been carried out. … READ MORE …

Bill Manning’s blog: Part X

Here is the latest of Bill’s blog posts. He, and we, hope it will be helpful to all those battling late stage prostate cancer. Click here for earlier parts if you missed them. … READ MORE …

What should one do if one’s PSA remains detectable after radical prostatectomy?

After surgery, PSA should become “undetectable” on a normal PSA test (i.e., < 0.1 ng/ml) within a month or two, but sometimes it remains elevated. The primary purpose of the ARO 96-02 randomized clinical trial was to determine whether there was an advantage to treating stage T3-4N0 patients while PSA was still undetectable, or whether they could wait to be treated. … READ MORE …

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