What’s being presented at the AUA in May: Part VII

A total of 44 presentations and posters address prostate cancer-specific topics under the general heading of “epidemiology and natural history” in three sessions at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association this year. … READ MORE …

OK … Time to do a little “catch-up”: Part II

This is the second of the two posts that are designed to “get us back up to speed” after last week’s hiatus, so here is information about some of the other interesting news that crossed your sitemaster’s screen over the past week … READ MORE …

OK … Time do do a little “catch-up”: Part I

The information in this post and the next is going to give you some basic updates from what has been happening over the past few days while your sitemaster has been having a temporary “meltdown”. Hopefully we can get back on track by something like Wednesday this week. … READ MORE …

Sometimes we all need to just take a break!

Your sitemaster apologizes for the fact that he has posted no new news over the past few days. He had to take a break … but you do deserve to know why … READ MORE …

Current and future imaging techniques and recurrent prostate cancer

An article just reproduced on the Medscape Oncology web site provides a very readable review of what the authors describe as, “A paradigm shift from anatomic to functional and molecular imaging in the detection of recurrent prostate cancer”. … READ MORE …

What’s being presented at the AUA in May: Part V

Eight papers on prostate cancer are being presented in the major plenary sessions at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association this year. All eight papers are interesting, but only the ones by Lin et al. and by Karnes et al. seem to hold potential for being of practice-changing significance. … READ MORE …

What’s being presented at the AUA in May: Part IV

There are numerous sessions at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association that focus on basic research and technical topics. A few of our readers may be interested in a very few of these presentations and posters, but the vast majority of these presentations and posters are about very early stage scientific research. … READ MORE …

What’s being presented at the AUA in May: Part I

This is the first of several summary posts commenting briefly on new data to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) this year. Individual presentations of important new data will be separately addressed … READ MORE …

AUA abstracts now accessible on line

As suggested in a post yesterday, the abstracts accepted for presentation at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) are now all accessible and searchable on line.

Abstracts of papers to be presented at AUA annual meeting

For those who are interested in doing their own “hunting” for new data being presented at the upcoming meeting of the American Urological Association (in May), the abstracts of papers to be presented at that meeting are now available on line in the Journal of Urology, and should soon be openly available in a searchable format on the meeting web site. … READ MORE …

A message from the National Association for Proton Therapy

According to a media release issued yesterday by the National Association for Proton Therapy (NAPT), “Approximately 97 percent of patients who received only an advanced form of radiation called proton therapy for prostate cancer report that they have not experienced a recurrence of their disease.” … READ MORE …

Bill Manning’s blog: Part III

Here is the third of Bill’s blog posts. He, and we, hope it will be helpful to all those battling late stage prostate cancer as he takes advantage of some of the new drugs that have come to market over the past couple of years. Click here for earlier parts if you missed them. … READ MORE …

Neuroendocrine prostate cancer and MLN8237 (alisertib)

Neuroendocrine prostate cancer or NEPC is an aggressive, late stage form of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with a very poor prognosis. Most patients will live for less than 12 months after diagnosis with NEPC. … READ MORE …

Does widespread PSA testing lower risk for prostate cancer-specific mortality?

The question of whether widespread testing/screening for risk of prostate cancer really does, on its own, lower risk for metastatic disease and prostate cancer-specific mortality is not yet resolved … however much one might want it to be! … READ MORE …

Dr. Laurence Klotz talks active surveillance on Cure Panel Talk Show

The most recent Cure Panel Talk Show on Prostate Cancer, featuring Dr. Laurence Klotz of Sunnybrook Cancer Center and the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada, is now available on line. … READ MORE …

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