Is active surveillance appropriate for men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer?

In a paper in the first issue of the new journal JAMA Oncology, a group of US-based researchers argue that data from a series of > 5,000 patients treated with first-line brachytherapy suggest that men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer are actually good candidates for active surveillance. … READ MORE …

SBRT for high-risk prostate cancer

Treatments for high-risk prostate cancer are limited. Surgery is usually considered a poor option if the cancer has already escaped the prostate capsule (stage T3/4). External beam radiation is often given with hormone therapy for high grade cancers, or with a brachytherapy boost. … READ MORE …

IADT, dutasteride, and the AVIAS trial — not the result some would want to hear

So the initial results of the AVIAS trial are not going to make a couple of our regular readers too happy — although at least a trial of the type they have been asking for has now been carried out. … READ MORE …

When should therapeutic intervention take place for men on active surveillance?

The fact of the matter is that, as yet, we don’t have a good answer for this question, and it may be many years before we do. The reasons for this are numerous, but we are beginning to get some of the information we need to clarify the situation. … READ MORE …

Valeant to acquire assets of Dendreon

According to information on the Reuters web site, Valeant, of Laval, Quebec, is to acquire Seattle-based Dendreon’s sipuleucel-T (Provenge) and other assets for $400 million in cash. Apparently there were no other qualified bidders that sought to compete with Valeant for these assets. Court approval of the sale will be sought on February 20.

Bill Manning’s blog: Part X

Here is the latest of Bill’s blog posts. He, and we, hope it will be helpful to all those battling late stage prostate cancer. Click here for earlier parts if you missed them. … READ MORE …

What should one do if one’s PSA remains detectable after radical prostatectomy?

After surgery, PSA should become “undetectable” on a normal PSA test (i.e., < 0.1 ng/ml) within a month or two, but sometimes it remains elevated. The primary purpose of the ARO 96-02 randomized clinical trial was to determine whether there was an advantage to treating stage T3-4N0 patients while PSA was still undetectable, or whether they could wait to be treated. … READ MORE …

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