Development of prostate cancer “organoids” may facilitate next-gen research

Researchers at Weill Medical College and at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York have worked out how to grow “organoids” from metastatic prostate cancer tissue. This may be important for the clinical testing of new types of treatment and (later on) for the ability to determine which drugs work well in individual patients. … READ MORE …

Addressing “sex vs. death” perceptions in prostate cancer treatment

The following is the full text of an article by Anne Katz, RN, PhD, who is a Clinical Nurse Specialist and AASECT-Certified Sexuality Counselor who blogs at ASCO Connection, where this post originally appeared. It is reproduced here with the kind permission of the American Society for Clinical Oncology. … READ MORE …

“There’s a sponge in my prostate, dear doctor, dear doctor”

About once in every 5,500 to 7,000 surgical operations carried out in hospitals around America each year, “something” gets left behind in a patient … and that “something” is most likely to be one of those small surgical sponges used to mop up excess blood or other fluids during the course of the operation. … READ MORE …

Educating newly diagnosed men about their prostate cancer before treatment

There is a short but simply outstanding article in this month’s issue of ASCO Connection by Anne Katz — a specialized oncology nurse who works up in Winnipeg, Manitoba. It deals with the conversations she has, often several times a day, with newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients at her institution. … READ MORE …

AR-V7 and resistance to treatment with enzalutamide, abiraterone

We have previously commented on early reports that prostate cancer patients carrying the androgen receptor subtype known as AR-V7 (the “isoform” encoded by splice variant 7) exhibit a high level of resistance to treatment with both enzalutamide (Xtandi) and abiraterone acetate (Zytiga). … READ MORE …

“Sexual bother” in advanced prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy

“Sexual bother” is a term used in the urology literature to refer to the side effects of all sorts of different treatments as they relate to everything from sexual desire to actual erectile and sexual function, the ability to ejaculate, etc. Frankly, it is not a term we like a lot because it encompasses such a vast range of sexually problematic issues. … READ MORE …

Denosumab therapy and risk for severe hypocalcemia

Denosumab — marketed as Xgeva and as Prolia — is associated with a rare but well-known risk for severe hypocalcemia (very low calcium in the blood stream). Denosumab, when give as Xgeva,  is specifically indicated for the prevention of skeletal-related events in patients with bone metastases from prostate and other forms of cancer. … READ MORE …

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,139 other followers