The absolute increase in risk of prostate cancer after a vasectomy

Late last week we commented briefly on a paper by Siddiqui et al. that had assessed the association between risk for a diagnosis of prostate cancer and the prior occurrence of a vasectomy in men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). … READ MORE …

No 15-year survival benefit associated with primary ADT in older men

In another paper just published on-line in JAMA Internal Medicine this week, the authors have provided additional data indicating — once again — the lack of any value of primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in the management of early-stage, localized prostate cancer among older patients. … READ MORE …

Physicians’ attitudes and the management of low-risk prostate cancer in older American men

According to newly published data in JAMA Internal Medicine and discussed on the Reuters web site today, “physician characteristics may play a larger role than disease characteristics when it comes to how patients with low-risk prostate cancer are initially treated.” This won’t come as a big surprise to most experienced prostate cancer advocates. … READ MORE …

5-ARIs and risk for high-grade prostate cancer: yet another data set

The question of whether the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) like finasteride (Proscar) and dutasteride (Avodart) is really associated with a significantly increased risk for diagnosis of high-risk and/or lethal prostate cancers remains unanswered. However, yet another set of data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) has offered us some additional insights. … READ MORE …

Sociodemographics and 10-year prostate cancer survival data

The issue of sociodemographic inequality in the delivery of cancer care is well understood in America — and we don’t really know how to provide a high quality of care to those who are disadvantaged by economic factors, racial factors, or other demographic factors (such a rural vs. urban issues of access to care). … READ MORE …

The Radical Remission Project

So it is well known that some cancer patients — even (very occasionally) those with metastatic forms of prostate cancer — have what have commonly and historically been known as “spontaneous” remissions. Their apparently lethal cancers simply seem to “disappear”. Why? We really have very little idea! … READ MORE …

If you’re already depressed, you may need help to make good decisions

In a rather less that surprising finding, a new paper in the Journal of Clinical Oncology reports that men with existing depressive disorders at the time of diagnosis with prostate cancer “are less likely to undergo definitive treatment and experience worse overall survival.” … READ MORE …

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