Re-classification rates on repeat biopsy for men on active surveillance in the Hopkins cohort

So there is an interesting new paper on the ramifications of active surveillance in the forthcoming June issue of the Journal of Urology — based on the extensive data now collected by the Johns Hopkins group through their very conservative active surveillance cohort of > 1,200 men accumulated since 1995. … READ MORE …

Slow but increasing uptake of observation in initial management of low-risk patients

A new article by Maurice et al. in the Canadian Urological Association Journal provides detailed information about the use of initial observation as a management strategy for low-risk prostate cancer between 2004 and 2011. … READ MORE …

The risks of upgrading and progression on active surveillance

Two recent reports provide us with some further information about the possibility of progression for patients who choose active surveillance as an initial mean to manage their risk for prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Application of active surveillance in Australia after 2008

A newly published study in BJU International has reported on the application of active surveillance in Australia (and specifically in the state of Victoria) between 2008 and 2012. … READ MORE …

Is active surveillance appropriate for men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer?

In a paper in the first issue of the new journal JAMA Oncology, a group of US-based researchers argue that data from a series of > 5,000 patients treated with first-line brachytherapy suggest that men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer are actually good candidates for active surveillance. … READ MORE …

When should therapeutic intervention take place for men on active surveillance?

The fact of the matter is that, as yet, we don’t have a good answer for this question, and it may be many years before we do. The reasons for this are numerous, but we are beginning to get some of the information we need to clarify the situation. … READ MORE …

HG-PIN, ASAP, and decisions about active surveillance

The presence of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN) or atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) in biopsy specimens does not appear to affect risk for upstaging or upgrading among men who are otherwise good candidates for active surveillance. … READ MORE …

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