NCCN expands role for active surveillance in initial management of localized prostate cancer

In its most recent update to its guidelines on the management of prostate cancer, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has now stated that active surveillance is a first-line option for the management of favorable, intermediate-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Development of a standardized commercial test to “score” patients as eligible for active surveillance

A new paper to be presented at the Genitourinary Prostate Cancer Symposium has proposed development of a standardized method to “score” whether patients are suitable candidates for initial management on active surveillance. … READ MORE …

Active surveillance for men with PSA levels up to 20 ng/ml?

A forthcoming paper in the Journal of Urology has suggested that active surveillance may be an acceptable option for selected patients with a clinical stage of ≤ T2a, a Gleason score of ≤ 6, but PSA levels of up to 20 ng/ml. … READ MORE …

Projecting the need for confirmatory biopsies in candidates for active surveillance

A newly published paper from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center group in New York has proposed a predictive model which might allow a high percentage of candidates for active surveillance as initial management to skip a second, confirmatory biopsy after initial diagnosis. … READ MORE –

From the past to the future … the appropriate use of active monitoring

A new article just published in the journal Cancer concludes that “active surveillance is underused” in the management of low-risk prostate cancer. However, one has to be careful about how one interpret the data in (and the conclusions of) this particular article. … READ MORE …

PCPC3 comments on recent data on active surveillance from Johns Hopkins

According to a message sent out earlier today by PCPC3 — the patient-centered prostate cancer collaborative coalition — the members of the coalition are “pleased to see the recently published report by Tosoian et al. indicating a 99.9% prostate cancer-specific survival rate at 10 and 15 years post-diagnosis”. … READ MORE …

Do African Americans with low-risk prostate cancer have lower PSA density than comparable Caucasians?

There have been a number of suggestions (as yet unproven) that African American men (and perhaps other men of black African ethnicity) may be less good candidates for active surveillance than men of Caucasian and Hispanic ethnicity. … READ MORE …

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