Should pure Gleason 6 disease still be called cancer — or not?

The annual meeting of the Society for Urological Oncology has been going to in Washington, DC, this week, and reports on the various sessions have been available on the UroToday web site. … READ MORE …

The future of cancer classification — a molecular realignment

Traditionally cancers have been classified according to their organ system of origin: prostate cancer, breast cancer, color-rectal cancer, etc. For several years now, it has been evident that this historic classification system needed a major overhaul … and that overhaul is now coming closer. … READ MORE …

Who decides the “value” of a new cancer drug — and how?

In an interesting wrinkle that may profoundly impact the drug pricing debate here in America, the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has decided to “score” the value of new cancer drugs as they are brought to market. … READ MORE …

More data that will cause controversy in the screening debate

Data from a very large, 25-year-long, randomized, controlled trial of screening for cancer has cast further doubt on the value of mass, annual, population-based screening as a way to reduce cancer deaths. … READ MORE …

Other sessions from the GU Oncology Symposium on Thursday

While the late morning and afternoon oral presentations on Thursday at the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium were by no means boring, neither could any of them have been described as exactly “practice changing”. … READ MORE …

Should Gleason 6 really be called “cancer”? … A brief review

The January 15 issue of Oncology contains a review article by Lepor and Donin entitled “Gleason 6 prostate cancer: serious malignancy or toothless lion?”. … READ MORE …

The costs of new drugs to treat cancer (and other disorders)

In what is being described as “an extraordinary step” in some media reports, a group of more than 100 leukemia specialists has just published an article in the journal Blood asking for a real dialog with the biopharmaceutical industry about the constantly increasing costs associated with new (and older) drugs for the treatment of this form of cancer. … READ MORE …

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