What’s being presented at ASCO this year: I

So here are some links to some initial key papers to be presented at ASCO this year. These four papers all address important issues affecting the treatment of metastatic and later stages of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

The potential of metformin in prostate cancer treatment: an update

We have previously commented (more than once) on the perception that metformin may have some value in the management of prostate cancer. A recently reported (albeit small), prospective Swiss study, has added to our knowledge in this regard. … READ MORE …

Phase II trial of tasquinimod shows overall survival benefit

A paper in Clinical Cancer Research has reported an overall survival (OS) benefit of the investigational drug tasquinimod compared to a placebo in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer after treatment with docetaxel-based chemotherapy.

These data come from the long-term follow-up of the randomized Phase II trial of tasquinimod, and we shall have to wait for the results of the ongoing Phase III trial to confirm these results, but, according to this paper by Armstrong et al.:

  • Patients taking tasquinimod had a median OS of 33.4 months compared to 30.4 months for men treated with a placebo.
  • Patients whose cancer had already metastasized to their bones survived an average of 34.2 months, compared to 27.1 months for men treated with a placebo.

Additional information about this study can be found in a media release from the Duke University Health System; in an article on the OncLive web site; and in the actual paper by Armstrong et al.

It is worth remembering that few of the patients originally enrolled in this Phase II trial would have received either abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide prior to their initial treatment with either tasquinimod or the placebo, and that some of these patients may well have received abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide (or both) after their treatment with tasquinimod. It may be difficult, as a consequence, to know how much of the survival benefit shown in this trial is a direct consequence of treatment with tasquinimod itself. This is one of the reasons that the outcome of the later Phase III trial will be very important.

Median OS was 33.4 months in the tasquinimod group versus 30.4 months for those taking placebo, investigators Armstrong et al reported. Results were best for the subgroup of 136 men in the study who had bone metastases; they experienced a 34.2 month OS as compared to 27.1 months for those who took placebo, the authors wrote.PFS lasted an average 7.6 months for men taking tasquinimod, as compared with 3.3 months for those on placebo; among men with bone metastases, those numbers rose to 8.4 months in the experimental group versus 3.4 months in the control group, Duke reported in an announcement about the findings.2 – See more at: http://www.onclive.com/publications/urologists-in-cancer-care/2013/December-2013/Tasquinimod-Improves-OS-PFS-in-CRPC-Data-Show?utm_source=Informz&utm_medium=OncLive&utm_campaign=Prostate%20eNews%20Zytiga%2001-22-14#sthash.impQwIoj.dpuf

Median OS was 33.4 months in the tasquinimod group versus 30.4 months for those taking placebo, investigators Armstrong et al reported. Results were best for the subgroup of 136 men in the study who had bone metastases; they experienced a 34.2 month OS as compared to 27.1 months for those who took placebo, the authors wrote.PFS lasted an average 7.6 months for men taking tasquinimod, as compared with 3.3 months for those on placebo; among men with bone metastases, those numbers rose to 8.4 months in the experimental group versus 3.4 months in the control group, Duke reported in an announcement about the findings.2 – See more at: http://www.onclive.com/publications/urologists-in-cancer-care/2013/December-2013/Tasquinimod-Improves-OS-PFS-in-CRPC-Data-Show?utm_source=Informz&utm_medium=OncLive&utm_campaign=Prostate%20eNews%20Zytiga%2001-22-14#sthash.impQwIoj.dpuf

Median OS was 33.4 months in the tasquinimod group versus 30.4 months for those taking placebo, investigators Armstrong et al reported. Results were best for the subgroup of 136 men in the study who had bone metastases; they experienced a 34.2 month OS as compared to 27.1 months for those who took placebo, the authors wrote.PFS lasted an average 7.6 months for men taking tasquinimod, as compared with 3.3 months for those on placebo; among men with bone metastases, those numbers rose to 8.4 months in the experimental group versus 3.4 months in the control group, Duke reported in an announcement about the findings.2 – See more at: http://www.onclive.com/publications/urologists-in-cancer-care/2013/December-2013/Tasquinimod-Improves-OS-PFS-in-CRPC-Data-Show?utm_source=Informz&utm_medium=OncLive&utm_campaign=Prostate%20eNews%20Zytiga%2001-22-14#sthash.impQwIoj.dpuf

A long way from actual clinical applicability, but interesting anyway …

There was an intriguing paper in the November 2013 issue of the journal Prostate suggesting that intermittent dosing with testosterone in between doses of androgen deprivation therapies may actually help men in the early stages of castration resistance to respond better to treatment over time. … READ MORE …

Patterns of treatment of European patients with CRPC in 2009-10

The full text of an article by Sternberg et al. (originally published in BMC Urology in 2013) has just been published to the Medscape Oncology web site and addresses patterns of treatment of men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in five European nations before wide availability of abiraterone. … READ MORE …

Moving forward by looking backward at men with CRPC

We may see some major shifts in the management of men with advanced forms of prostate cancer in the next few years. … READ MORE …

EC gives marketing approval for radium-223 in metastatic CRPC

We understand that, earlier today, the European Commission (EC) approved radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®) for the treatment of men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), symptomatic bone metastases, and no known visceral metastases. … READ MORE …

SMIP004: is it really the next “hot thing” for treatment of CRPC?

If the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute is to be believed, the next “hot thing” likely to enter clinical trials for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a drug currently known as SMIP004. … READ MORE …

MALAT-1 as a potential target in treatment of progressive prostate cancer

A Shanghai-based research group has suggested that expression of MALAT-1 (metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1), which is a large, non-coding ribonucleic acid (RNA), may be involved in some way with progression toward castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). … READ MORE …

Expert opinion on ADT for CRPC today

As regular readers will be well aware, the implementation of varying types of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in hormone-sensitive and in castration-resistant forms of progressive prostate cancer is evolving. Five or so years from now we may be looking at a very different set of ways to use ADT than those we have been used to. … READ MORE …

Tokai gets funding to expand Phase II trial of galeterone in CRPC

In April 2012 we had noted that Tokai Pharmaceuticals was planning to initiate a Phase II trial of its investigational drug galeterone (also known as TOK-001) in the treatment of men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The company has now announced that it has the funding to expand enrollment in this Phase II trial. … READ MORE …

AUA also issues new guidance on treatment of patients with CRPC

Earlier today, the American Urological Association issued new guidance to its members on the management of patients with non-metastatic and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). … READ MORE …

Statins in clinical trials for advanced forms of prostate cancer

An editorial  by Freeman and Solomon (“Statin drugs and prostate cancer: time to consider proactive strategies in patients“) in the April issue of the Journal of Urology has proposed the idea of combining abiraterone acetate with a statin as a method to treat men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). … READ MORE …

Recent lecture on the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer

The UroToday web site has just posted a detailed report on a presentation by Stephen Freedland, MD, of Duke University, given at the South East Section meeting of the American Urological Association in Williamsburg, VA, last month. This report will likely be of interest to patients with progressive forms of prostate cancer and many support group leaders. … READ MORE …

Could EZH2 be critical to castration resistance?

According to an article published in Science on Friday last week, activation of an epigenetic regulator known as EZH2 (“enhancer of zeste homolog 2″) may be critical to the onset and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). … READ MORE …

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