The evolution of nuclear imaging in the management of prostate cancer

What is properly known as “nuclear imaging” is the use of (usually injectable) radioactive compounds into the body that have no known clinical effects but which can be targeted to “light up” and demonstrate the presence of specific types of tissue. … READ MORE …

> 40 percent of low-risk prostate cancer patients were getting inappropriate imaging tests

A new paper in JAMA Oncology has shown that between 2004 and 2007 nearly 45 percent of men initially diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer were receiving unnecessary bone scans and CT scans in some regions of the USA. … READ MORE …

RSI-MRI — a new entrant into the prostate cancer imaging field

According to an article published recently in Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, a “better” form of MRI may be able to improve the accuracy of prostate imaging over current techniques. … READ MORE …

Next prostate cancer CureTalk on January 20

The next CureTalk program on prostate cancer is scheduled for January 20, 2015, at 5:00 p.m. Eastern time in the USA. The featured speaker is Dr. James Mohler of the Roswell Park Cancer Center in Buffalo, New York. To register for this program, … READ MORE …

Potential new imaging agent in diagnosis, monitoring of prostate cancer

About 19 months ago we reported that a company called Progenics Pharmaceuticals had acquired all rights to a small, radiolabeled molecule known as [99mTc]MIP-1404, and that an international, multi-center Phase II trial was  investigating the clinical activity of [99mTc]MIP-1404 as a prostate cancer imaging agent. … READ MORE …

7-T MRIs in the diagnosis and work-up of localized prostate cancer

References to 1.5-T, 3-T, and 7-T MRI machines are based on the size and power of the magnets used in the creation of MRI images by the machines. The T stands for “tesla”. It is a measure of magnetic flux density, and one tesla (1 T) is equal to one weber per square metre (1 Wb/m2). … READ MORE …

Potential new imaging test for metastatic prostate cancer

According to a newly published study in the journal Cancer Research, a collaborative research team at the Massey Cancer Center of Virgina Commonwealth University and at Johns Hopkins has developed a new, systemically administered, non-invasive, molecular-genetic technique to image bone metastases resulting from prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

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