The choice of active surveillance: patient and partner perceptions

Two recent papers in the journal Psycho-oncology offer us interesting insights into patients’ (and their partners’) current perceptions about the role of active surveillance in the management of low-risk, localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

What’s being presented at ASCO this year: III

Another interesting presentation being made at the ASCO annual meeting this year will be the first report on a series of nearly 400 patients who did not conform to what would normally be considered a series of sound criteria for low risk disease. These patients all elected, as individuals, to go on actiuve surveillance despite their higher than average risk for progression. … READ MORE …

“Best care” doesn’t equate to better outcomes! That’s not good!

A poster by Schroeck et al. — to be presented on May 20 at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) — presents the latest set of data suggesting that “best care” does not lead to appropriate outcomes quality for men receiving standard forms of treatment for localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Use of expectant management more than doubles since 2004

According to a presentation at the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, there has been a significant, recent increase in the numbers of men with low-risk prostate cancer who get care in the USA through some form of expectant management (active surveillance, watchful waiting, etc.). … READ MORE …

Criteria for active surveillance are gradually improving

Being diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer is a good reason to consider management under active surveillance (as opposed to immediate, early intervention) … but active surveillance won’t be right for every low-risk patient! … READ MORE …

Medium-term follow-up of > 450 men on active surveillance in UK study

A large, single-institution study of active surveillance in England, just reported European Urology,  has again demonstrated the potential value of active surveillance in the management of low-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

EAU updates guidelines on screening, diagnosis, and management of localized prostate cancer

The European Association of Urology (EAU) has just updated its guideline document “EAU guidelines on prostate cancer. Part 1: Screening, diagnosis, and local treatment with curative intent”. … READ MORE …

Patients and urologists both prefer active surveillance (maybe, in the Netherlands)

It has been a while since we saw data from a contemporary survey of the views of urologists and patients on their preferences for appropriate management of early stage, localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Can we really re-frame low-risk prostate cancer as a chronic disease?

Many readers of this web site may be interested in a video discussion on the Medscape web site between two relatively young urologists about the implications of the Prostate Outcomes Outcomes Study (PCOS), on which we commented a few months back. … READ MORE …

Recent lecture on the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer

The UroToday web site has just posted a detailed report on a presentation by Stephen Freedland, MD, of Duke University, given at the South East Section meeting of the American Urological Association in Williamsburg, VA, last month. This report will likely be of interest to patients with progressive forms of prostate cancer and many support group leaders. … READ MORE …

ASCO’s new CancerLinQ initiative

As we move near to the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) — which will start at the end of May in Chicago — ASCO has been making a lot of noise about its prototype CancerLinQ™ network. Just how valuable this will be for the future management of prostate cancer will take a while to work out. … READ MORE …

Lots of new tests, but will they really make a difference?

An article by Andrew Pollack in Tuesday’s New York Times is entitled “New prostate cancer tests could reduce false alarms.” However, we encourage our readers to scrutinize this article with care. It is full of “may”s, “could”s, “might”s, and “if”s (as one should expect). … READ MORE …

Managing the side effects of ADT — a new review

According to a new analysis and review of recent, published data, the “numerous well recognized adverse effects” of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) include “vasomotor flushing, loss of libido and impotence, fatigue, gynecomastia, anemia, osteoporosis and metabolic complications, as well as effects on cardiovascular health and bone density.” … READ MORE …

Active surveillance as a management strategy for younger men with low-risk disease

So a new paper just published on line  in BJU International has (finally) provided some data to support a perspective that The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink has believed in for a considerable period of time … that active surveillance is a perfectly reasonable option for a high proportion of patients with low-risk prostate cancer who are ≤ 55 years of age. … READ MORE …

Dr. Peter Scardino on “screening” for risk of prostate cancer

There is an interesting piece just posted on the UroToday web site in which Dr. Peter Scardino (the Chief of Surgery at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, and the surgeon whose outcome data were used to develop the early versions of the Kattan nomograms) talks about appropriate modern attitudes to “screening” for prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

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