Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate: of risk, outcomes, and Gleason scores

In a recent article in the American Journal of Surgical Pathology, Khani and Epstein have argued that patients initially diagnosed with intraductal carcinoma of the prostate (IDC-P) should have this reported as a separate class of prostate cancer, with no reference to the patients’ Gleason scores. … READ MORE …

Selection of appropriate candidates for management with active surveillance

In this month’s issue of the Journal of Urology, Dr. Peter Carroll (of UCSF) and Dr. Mark Dall’Era (formerly of UCSF and now at UCDavis) have contributed an editorial entitled “What is the optimal way to select candidates for active surveillance of prostate cancer?” … READ MORE …

Expectant management is really “coming of age” in the USA

An excellent new review article in CA: A Cancer Journal of Clinicians, along with a research letter just published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) have provided us with an important update on the value and the increasing acceptance of expectant management in the treatment of lower-risk forms of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Trends in the management of localized prostate cancer: 2000 to 2010

The international trend back toward increased use of more conservative management techniques (e.g., active surveillance and watchful waiting) for men with low-risk disease is again indicated in data from the Anglian region of the National Health Service in the UK. … READ MORE …

Slow but increasing uptake of observation in initial management of low-risk patients

A new article by Maurice et al. in the Canadian Urological Association Journal provides detailed information about the use of initial observation as a management strategy for low-risk prostate cancer between 2004 and 2011. … READ MORE …

Application of active surveillance in Australia after 2008

A newly published study in BJU International has reported on the application of active surveillance in Australia (and specifically in the state of Victoria) between 2008 and 2012. … READ MORE …

In 2004-07 most Medicare-eligible men were getting radiation therapy for first-line treatment of prostate cancer

In a second article in the new journal JAMA Oncology, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles suggest that 58 percent of all relatively recent treatment for prostate cancer was being given by radiation therapy of some type, and that indolent prostate cancer was being significantly over-treated. … READ MORE …

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