Does being fit at 50 really NOT lower risk for prostate cancer?

A new study just published in JAMA Oncology appears to suggest that a man’s fitness at age 50 lowers his risk for cardiovascular disease, for colon cancer, and for lung cancer, but actually increases his risk for prostate cancer. One might justifiably wonder whether this makes sense. … READ MORE …

After 10 years, risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality lower for high-risk patients

A paper presented at the annual meeting of the European Association of Urology (EAU) suggests that high-risk prostate cancer patients < 60 years of age at the time of radical prostatectomy are more likely to die from their cancer than from other causes during the first 10 years after their surgery. But after that, other causes of death become more likely. … READ MORE …

An aggressive, ETS-negative subtype of prostate cancer

A paper just published in Cancer Research suggests that a particular ETS-negative subtype of prostate cancer (ERGMAP3K7delCHD1del) is highly aggressive, and that coordinate loss of the MAP3K7 and CHD1 genes are potentially a unique driver of development of aggressive prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Prediction of the “real” risk of death from prostate cancer

A while ago now we first discussed research being done by Eric Feuer and others on what was initially being called the Cancer Survival Query System or CSQS. … READ MORE …

The “Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly” (ASPREE) trial

Your sitemaster has just been made aware of a trial that has been ongoing since 2010. However, it may have implications for determining whether regular aspirin therapy can actually lower risk for prostate cancer-specific mortality. … READ MORE …

Who’s actually dying of prostate cancer (in France) today?

A newly published paper from a French research group has provided some interesting data on which patients actually die of prostate cancer in the modern, post-PSA era. … READ MORE …

One more reason to cut out the cigarettes

Surgeons already don’t like to operate on smokers. They don’t do as well during and after surgery as non-smokers, not least because smokers can have problems with anesthesia. Now come data suggesting that smoking during radiation therapy is a pretty lousy idea too. … READ MORE …

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