The increasing incidence of neuroendocrine forms of prostate cancer

A newly published analysis by a research team at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine has teased out some additional information about the well-recognized increase in the incidence of neuroendocrine forms of prostate cancer over the past 20 or so years. … READ MORE …

Risk for prostate cancer among black males in England

A newly published article in the British Medical Journal has shown that black males in England are twice as likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer as white males, and are twice as likely to die of prostate cancer too. … READ MORE …

Are prostate cancer-specific mortality rates in Australia higher than they should be?

An article just published in the World Journal of Urology has suggested that rates of prostate cancer-specific mortality in Australia seem to have been unexpectedly higher than in the USA. … READ MORE …

New data on 5-ARI treatment in prevention of and and risk for prostate cancer

A new article in the journal JAMA Oncology has again suggested that the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) like finasteride/Proscar and dutasteride/Avodart is not, in fact, associated with any significant risk for clinically significant prostate cancer let alone risk for prostate cancer-specific mortality. … READ MORE …

Does regular aspirin therapy improve survival of prostate cancer patients?

An open-access, full text article in the April issue of the Journal of Urology addresses long-standing questions about the impact of regular aspirin use on the long-term outcomes of men diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer. … READ MORE

The risks of upgrading and progression on active surveillance

Two recent reports provide us with some further information about the possibility of progression for patients who choose active surveillance as an initial mean to manage their risk for prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Does being fit at 50 really NOT lower risk for prostate cancer?

A new study just published in JAMA Oncology appears to suggest that a man’s fitness at age 50 lowers his risk for cardiovascular disease, for colon cancer, and for lung cancer, but actually increases his risk for prostate cancer. One might justifiably wonder whether this makes sense. … READ MORE …

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