Consensus statement on pathologic factors and active surveillance

As previously mentioned earlier this week, a long statement that deals with the role of the pathologist in determining the suitability of patients for enrollment into active surveillance management protocols has been issued and endorsed by a number of organizations. … READ MORE …

Should pure Gleason 6 disease still be called cancer — or not?

The annual meeting of the Society for Urological Oncology has been going to in Washington, DC, this week, and reports on the various sessions have been available on the UroToday web site. … READ MORE …

Over-treatment of older men with life expectancies < 10 years

According to a paper newly published in Cancer, “Men aged < 80 years at diagnosis who have life expectancies < 10 years often receive aggressive treatment for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer, mostly with radiation therapy.” … READ MORE …

Prostate cancer risk, outcomes, and quality of life; exercise affects all of these

The November issue of the AUA News carries a clear and succinct article directed to urologists about the value of exercise in the prevention and management of prostate cancer. Alas, the full text of this article is only available to members of the American Urological Association (AUA). … READ MORE …

HG-PIN, ASAP, and decisions about active surveillance

The presence of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN) or atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) in biopsy specimens does not appear to affect risk for upstaging or upgrading among men who are otherwise good candidates for active surveillance. … READ MORE …

The dangers of using nomograms to compare apples to oranges

A cross-specialty group of prostate cancer experts has reviewed data from > 13,000 patients on the accuracy of nomograms in predicting biochemical recurrence and actual prostate cancer-specific mortality after three different types of treatment. … READ MORE …

A compound genetic/genomic and microenvironmental risk classification for localized prostate cancer

As we become more knowledgeable about the underlying genetic and other factors that affect the risk for, and the risk for progression of, apparently localized prostate cancer, we also become more able to predict such risks … but this is a very complex topic. … READ MORE …

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