Is baseline free serum T a factor in appropriate management on active surveillance?

Analysis of data from a cohort of 154 Chilean men with prostate cancer, all being monitored on active surveillance, suggests that free serum testosterone levels (but not total testosterone levels) may be able to help to predict which of these men will go on to need active treatment. … READ MORE …

The choice of active surveillance: patient and partner perceptions

Two recent papers in the journal Psycho-oncology offer us interesting insights into patients’ (and their partners’) current perceptions about the role of active surveillance in the management of low-risk, localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Can the phi test accurately predict who should go on active surveillance?

In more data reported at ASCO yesterday afternoon, we got the first real look at what appears to be a helpful study designed to evaluate whether the Beckman Coulter Prostate Health Index (or phi) test is really able to identify men who are good candidates for active surveillance. … READ MORE …

Other interesting active surveillance data from the AUA meeting in Orlando

In addition to the Sunnybrook data already reported today, three significant other studies presented at the AUA meeting have provided us with valuable information on the practical application of active surveillance. … READ MORE …

Formal update on Sunnybrook active surveillance data at AUA annual meeting

Over the weekend, Klotz et al. provided interesting new information in the third and most recent, formal update of the prospective data from the active surveillance series being monitored at Sunnybrook Cancer Center in Toronto, Canada. … READ MORE …

What’s being presented at ASCO this year: III

Another interesting presentation being made at the ASCO annual meeting this year will be the first report on a series of nearly 400 patients who did not conform to what would normally be considered a series of sound criteria for low risk disease. These patients all elected, as individuals, to go on actiuve surveillance despite their higher than average risk for progression. … READ MORE …

UroToday interviews with D’Amico, Klotz, Mulhall

Many readers of this blog may be interested in listening to one or more of a series of recent, relatively short audio-interviews with respected opinion-leaders in the prostate cancer diagnosis and management community, conducted by the medical director of UroToday. … READ MORE …

Use of expectant management more than doubles since 2004

According to a presentation at the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, there has been a significant, recent increase in the numbers of men with low-risk prostate cancer who get care in the USA through some form of expectant management (active surveillance, watchful waiting, etc.). … READ MORE …

One man’s route to active surveillance as a first-line management strategy

When CT learned that he had low-grade, organ-confined prostate cancer, he did not decide to get surgical or other therapeutic interventions immediately, based on the guidance of the first doctors he saw. Instead, he decided to actively monitor his disease and adjust his lifestyle habits with guidance from a team of specialists. … READ MORE …

How low is the risk for Gleason score progression over time?

A new study report in Cancer Research suggests that: (a) prostate cancer aggressiveness may be established when the initial tumor is formed and not alter over time; (b) active surveillance or similar monitoring strategies really are the most appropriate initial management option for men with low-grade, low-risk cancer (potentially regardless of their age at diagnosis). … READ MORE …

Active surveillance and racial difference in risk

A new article in Urology (“the Gold journal”) suggests that African American men diagnosed with low-risk forms of prostate cancer may need to meet more stringent criteria than Caucasian Americans if they are to be appropriately managed on active surveillance protocols. Why? Because they appear to be at higher risk for disease progression. … READ MORE …

Counseling and support associated with active surveillance: highly necessary for some

It is well understood that some (perhaps even many) men diagnosed with low-risk disease have difficulty accepting active monitoring of any type as an effective and safe management strategy for deferring immediate, unnecessary treatment  — and perhaps being able to avoid treatment at all. … READ MORE …

National Proactive Surveillance Network goes live in Baltimore and Los Angeles

As reported previously, in May 2010, the Prostate Cancer Foundation, in association with Johns Hopkins and the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center announced their intention to develop a national initiative to track the management of men with prostate cancer using active monitoring  (“active surveillance”) as opposed to invasive treatment. … READ MORE …

Speciality bias still affecting treatment recommendations for low-risk prostate cancer?

A majority of urologists and radiation oncologists are still not recommending active monitoring (“active surveillance”) as a first-line method for the management of patients with low-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

All the PIVOT trial hype from Europe

There has been a lot of media hype in Europe around the re-presentation of the PIVOT data by Dr. Wilt at the annual meeting of the European Association of Urology in Paris last week. And yet every prostate cancer specialist attending that meeting must have already been well aware of these data. … READ MORE …

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