One size doesn’t fit all when it comes to prostate cancer risk assessment

A newly published article in the journal Cancer is probably going to drive a number of readers of this blog to distraction — and for any number of good reasons, starting with the idea that all prostate cancer screening either should be or might be discontinued (as suggested by the USPSTF). … READ MORE …

USPSTF on PSA screening … a current update …

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has just issued its “Guide to Clinical Preventive Services” for 2014. The publication (which is available on line) includes summary information about screening for prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

“A plea for individualized prostate cancer screening”

For some years, Vickers, Lilja, and their associates have been arguing that baseline PSA level is able to predict long-term risk for prostate cancer, and now a new paper in European Urology seems to provide support for this argument and a practical clinical strategy for its application. … READ MORE …

A 13-year update from the ERSPC screening trial

So one of the presentations given at the recent EAU meeting in Stockholm was an update, by Dr. Jonas Hugosson, at a median 13 years of follow-up, from the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC)  — and there is some good news, but maybe not enough to get carried away by … yet. READ MORE …

Genetic testing and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act

Genetic information is starting to become a key factor in the testing of selected men for their risk for certain types of prostate cancer, and for the potential value of certain therapeutic agents in the treatment of prostate cancer in selected individuals. … READ MORE …

Poor guidance from the AAFP, badly interpreted by the media

According to a recent recommendation from the American Academy of Family Physicians in association with the Choosing Wisely campaign. primary care physicians are being advised as follows: … READ MORE …

New prospective study supports baseline PSA testing for men in 40s

According to a newly published, prospective study in the Journal of Urology, a research team at the Mayo Clinic has confirmed prior reports (based on retrospective data) that a baseline PSA in men aged between 40 and 49 years can be used to categorize men into low and higher prostate cancer risk groups. … READ MORE …

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