New urine test shows promising results in detecting, classifying risk for prostate cancer

A newly published article in BJU International has described a way to test post-DRE urine samples for the presence of specific types of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and use these data to detect and classify risk levels for more and less aggressive forms of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Mutations to FOXA1 may be key to some aggressive forms of prostate cancer

A newly published study by researchers at the University of Michigan has clarified the potential roles of a transcription factor called “forkhead box A1” (FOXA1) in hormone-driven forms of prostate cancer and some other forms of hormone-driven cancer (e.g., breast cancer). … READ MORE …

Genomic data and prostate cancer risk classification: an update

Three different molecular tests have been validated as providing useful data that can help a man and his doctors to come to decisions about the management and treatment of localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Decision aids and prostate cancer: how useful are they?

Your sitemaster has long had concerns about the real value of decision aids in helping men to think about and come to conclusions about controversial issues in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

3-year outcomes of men on AS in US community urology settings

To date we have seen very few data on the long-term follow-up of men in the US being initially managed on active surveillance (AS) after diagnosis with prostate cancer out in the “real world” of community urology practice. … READ MORE …

Patient satisfaction and the management of localized prostate cancer

A recent paper from a large Swedish research group has addressed patient satisfaction and the management of localized prostate cancer — with a specific, inclusive focus on the satisfaction of men initially managed on active surveillance. … READ MORE …

AS in practice in a specific US community setting

In a presentation at the ASCO annual meeting, Dr. Ronald Chen reported that just 32 percent of newly diagnosed men who were initially managed on active surveillance (AS) in North Carolina between 2011 and 2013 were actually managed in compliance with guideline recommended monitoring. … READ MORE …