“Right to try” legislation and the management of prostate cancer

As many of our readers may be aware, the “right to try” treatments using investigational new drugs outside of the clinical trials processes required by drug developers and overseen by the US Food and Drug Administration is a current “hot topic” on Capitol Hill. … READ MORE …

US-based, Phase II trial of lutetium-177 PSMA-directed endoradiotherapy

We have been provided (by the developers) with additional information about a US-based, Phase II, clinical trial of a form of radiation therapy using the targeted agent lutetium-177 prostate-specific membrane antigen 617 (177Lu-PSMA-617) for treatment of men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). … READ MORE …

The “hyping” of new forms of treatment for cancer

In a newly published article on the STAT web site, two clinicians at Oregon Health and Science University argue that the benefits of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer are being greatly over-“hyped”. … READ MORE …

Second PARP inhibitor approved by FDA (but still not for prostate cancer)

A second PARP inhibitor has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with BRCA1/2 mutations and advanced ovarian cancer who have already received two types of chemotherapy. … READ MORE …

Data from the first really large trial of CAR-T in treatment of lymphoma

As yet, there has been no serious clinical exploration of whether the new types of CAR-T treatment can be applied to patients with either prostate cancer or any other form of solid tumor. … READ MORE …

Minnelide: a possible new drug for the treatment of CRPC?

According to a recently published article in The Prostate, researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed a new type of drug that they believe may have high therapeutic potential in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). … READ MORE …

Another research team, and another micro-RNA …

Last week we mentioned that one specific form of micro-ribonucleic acid (miRNA) may be usable in the development of a drug or drugs to stop the process of metastasis in men with high-risk forms of prostate cancer. Another recent study goes one step further than that. … READ MORE …