Active surveillance in men with Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 prostate cancer at diagnosis

A critical question for men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer (based primarily on a Gleason score of 3 + 4 = 7) can often be, “How safe would it be for me to go on active surveillance for a while after initial diagnosis?” … READ MORE …

Testosterone supplements and new AUA guidelines on management of testosterone deficiency

The increasingly widespread use of testosterone supplements has been of concern for many years. In particular, for men with a history of prostate cancer diagnosis, the appropriate use of testosterone supplementation has been a matter of special focus. … READ MORE …

How anxiety affects prostate cancer patients on active surveillance over time

“Anxiety” of different types is a problem associated with every diagnosis of prostate cancer. Such anxiety comes with particular implications for men implementing active surveillance as an initial management strategy after initial diagnosis with very low-, low-, or favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Are genomic tests for prognostic risk at diagnosis really helpful (yet)?

One of the critical and unanswered questions about the value of genomic/genetic testing in relation to the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer is, “What are the currently available tests actually telling us compared to the clinical data?” … READ MORE …

Short-term ADT for men on active surveillance?

One paper to be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Urological Association (AUS) gives results from treatment with a 3-month dose of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for men with low-risk prostate cancer compared to standard active surveillance. … READ MORE …

How well did your urologist do for you?

A new report in the journal JAMA Surgery has suggested that urologists who see fewer patients tend to get higher satisfaction ratings than those with higher-volume practices. … READ MORE …

On active and proactive surveillance

Once upon a time (and not so long ago) newly diagnosed men with some types of prostate cancer used to think your sitemaster was out of his tiny mind when he would suggest to them that they might be wise to just monitor their situation rather than rush into treatment. … READ MORE …