Did you get an MRI scan as part of your clinical work-up for prostate cancer risk?

A report in the journal Urology (the so-called “Gold Journal”) from a team of researchers at Yale School of Medicine has shown that having a prostate MRI as part of the work-up for a patient initially diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer roughly doubled the chance that such a patient was initially managed on “observation”. … READ MORE …

Active surveillance in men with Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 prostate cancer at diagnosis

A critical question for men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer (based primarily on a Gleason score of 3 + 4 = 7) can often be, “How safe would it be for me to go on active surveillance for a while after initial diagnosis?” … READ MORE …

Reports from the EAU “Update on Prostate Cancer” meeting in Vienna

The European Association of Urology (EAU) “Update on Prostate Cancer” meeting was held in Vienna, Austria, on Friday and Saturday, and Dr. Zachary Klaassen was again busy providing summary reports on presentations for UroToday. … READ MORE …

Significant variation in application of active surveillance

According to an article in the journal Cancer, men with low-risk prostate cancer diagnosed and managed at high-volume hospitals are 3.6 times more likely to be managed on active surveillance than those managed at low-volume institutions. … READ MORE …

Howard Wolinsky has a new problem …

… and it’s one that is not exactly uncommon for older men (with or without prostate cancer). … To get the scoop, just click here. … READ MORE …

Howard Wolinsky takes another step on his active surveillance travels

In his latest post on the MedPage Today web site, Howard Wolinsky (a freelance journalist based in the Chicago area), who has been on active surveillance since 2010, writes about the result of his most recent rebiopsy. His last one was in 2013. There was (again) “no evidence of malignancy” in the post-biopsy pathology report. … READ MORE …

It was true 3 years ago, but is it still the case?

One of the problems with a lot of research is that it is out of date by the time it is published. The following example may be a classic case in point. And it has serious implications. … READ MORE …