For patients on or considering active surveillance

Prostate Cancer International wishes to announce the development and official opening of its online Active Surveillance Virtual Support Group. … READ MORE …

The MEAL study — an update

Back in 2011, what is now the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (ACTO) but was then CALGB (Cancer and Leukemia Group B) initiated the Men’s Eating and Living (MEAL) study. This trial is, we hope, going to give us some real answers to a very important question: does diet affect risk for the progression of prostate cancer in men on active surveillance? … READ MORE …

An update from Howard Wolinsky — on active surveillance + type 2 diabetes (and the power of diet)

So regular readers will be aware of several articles by Howard Wolinsky on his experiences as a man monitoring low-risk prostate cancer on active surveillance since 2010. Apparently this was insufficiently challenging. In June he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2B) as well. … READ MORE …

5-year data from another large series of men on active surveillance

A new article in the Scandinavian Journal of Urology has provided 5-year outcomes data from a large, prospective, single-center study of men in Denmark initially managed on active surveillance. … READ MORE …

The role of mpMRI in monitoring of men on active surveillance

At least one paper has stated that some 40 percent of men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer here in the US are now being initially managed on active surveillance. If active surveillance is being done properly, this is a good thing! However, … READ MORE …

Predicting outcomes on active surveillance for intermediate-risk patients

It is now clear that men who meet NCCN criteria for very low- and low-risk forms of prostate cancer are almost invariably good candidates for initial management on active surveillance (i.e., just monitoring as opposed to immediate treatment). … READ MORE …

Low volume, Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 disease: is active surveillance a realistic option?

It would be easy to misinterpret (or at least “over-interpret”) a recent paper from the group at Johns Hopkins about the pathological outcomes of men initially diagnosed with very low-, low-, or “favorable” intermediate-risk localized disease and treated by immediate radical prostatectomy. … READ MORE …