An update from Howard Wolinsky — on active surveillance + type 2 diabetes (and the power of diet)

So regular readers will be aware of several articles by Howard Wolinsky on his experiences as a man monitoring low-risk prostate cancer on active surveillance since 2010. Apparently this was insufficiently challenging. In June he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2B) as well. … READ MORE …

5-year data from another large series of men on active surveillance

A new article in the Scandinavian Journal of Urology has provided 5-year outcomes data from a large, prospective, single-center study of men in Denmark initially managed on active surveillance. … READ MORE …

The role of mpMRI in monitoring of men on active surveillance

At least one paper has stated that some 40 percent of men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer here in the US are now being initially managed on active surveillance. If active surveillance is being done properly, this is a good thing! However, … READ MORE …

Predicting outcomes on active surveillance for intermediate-risk patients

It is now clear that men who meet NCCN criteria for very low- and low-risk forms of prostate cancer are almost invariably good candidates for initial management on active surveillance (i.e., just monitoring as opposed to immediate treatment). … READ MORE …

Low volume, Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 disease: is active surveillance a realistic option?

It would be easy to misinterpret (or at least “over-interpret”) a recent paper from the group at Johns Hopkins about the pathological outcomes of men initially diagnosed with very low-, low-, or “favorable” intermediate-risk localized disease and treated by immediate radical prostatectomy. … READ MORE …

“Active surveillance: protecting patients from harm”

If you want to get a current update on the management of patients on active surveillance, you need to listed to/watch this presentation by Dr. Lawrence Klotz on the UroToday web site. But you will need 45 minutes. … READ MORE …

Does Test X change what physicians actually do and say to their patients?

One of the key ways in which we can (and do) assess the “value” of new types of medical test is by the degree to which they actually change the ways physicians act on the data and make decisions and/or recommendations about patient management. … READ MORE …