Correlating baseline PSA levels to future 10-year risk of prostate cancer diagnosis

A new paper in the Journal of Urology represents an initial attempt, based on a prospective, multi-ethnic cohort of nearly 3,000 men, to determine whether baseline PSA levels can predict, with a high level of reliability, subsequent risk for and consequential diagnosis of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

“A plea for individualized prostate cancer screening”

For some years, Vickers, Lilja, and their associates have been arguing that baseline PSA level is able to predict long-term risk for prostate cancer, and now a new paper in European Urology seems to provide support for this argument and a practical clinical strategy for its application. … READ MORE …

New prospective study supports baseline PSA testing for men in 40s

According to a newly published, prospective study in the Journal of Urology, a research team at the Mayo Clinic has confirmed prior reports (based on retrospective data) that a baseline PSA in men aged between 40 and 49 years can be used to categorize men into low and higher prostate cancer risk groups. … READ MORE …

Baseline PSA levels and 10-year risk for a diagnosis of prostate cancer

Earlier, retrospective studies based on Swedish and Danish databases have suggested that men in their 40s with a single PSA level of < 1.0 ng/ml are at low risk for a diagnosis of prostate cancer for up to 30 years after that initial, baseline PSA result. … READ MORE …

Can we use prostate cancer to develop national trial registry systems?

The April issue of AUA News (a magazine only available to AUA members) includes an interesting article by David Penson, MD, in which he previews a lecture he will be giving at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Urological Association (in Atlanta, later this month). … READ MORE …

Long-term, PSA-based risk for prostate cancer

In September last year we provided information about a Danish study by Orsted et al. on the use of PSA levels in projecting the long-term risk of prostate cancer that had been presented at a scientific meeting in Europe. … READ MORE …

Baseline PSA and prostate cancer-specific mortality

It is well understood that a diagnosis of prostate cancer does not necessarily imply that the patient will ever have progressive disease — let alone that he will die of prostate cancer. Indeed, the number of men in America who die of prostate cancer today is believed to be significantly less than three for every 100 men diagnosed. … READ MORE …