Race and survival of men after docetaxel-based treatment for mCRPC

A new paper in the Journal of Clinical Oncology has just reported that the overall survival (OS) of black and white men diagnosed with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) seems to be near to identical after treatment with docetaxel or a docetaxel-containing regimen. … READ MORE …

Is Gleason 6 prostate cancer really “more lethal” in black men?

A commentary in Renal and Urology News this morning is entitled “Gleason 6 prostate cancer is more lethal in black men”. … READ MORE …

Prediction of risk for aggressive prostate cancer among Black males

A newly published paper has now suggested that data from a single PSA test carried out when the men are between 40 and 64 years of age can be used to project risk for aggressive prostate cancer among African-American men. … READ MORE …

Risk for prostate cancer among black males in England

A newly published article in the British Medical Journal has shown that black males in England are twice as likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer as white males, and are twice as likely to die of prostate cancer too. … READ MORE …

Treatment regret among men with recurrent prostate cancer

The issue of treatment regret comes up regularly among men after first-line treatment for localized prostate cancer, but has been less commonly addressed among men with recurrent disease post-treatment. … READ MORE …

Is race a factor in exercise and prostate cancer prevention?

We have known for some time that regular exercise may lower risk for prostate cancer. Indeed, a study by Clarke and Whittemore published in 2000 suggested that men who take little to no exercise may be 1.7 times more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than those who exercise with a degree of regularity. … READ MORE …

Black men just don’t get the best quality of surgical care

In a number of papers dating back to the 1990s, Moul and colleagues clearly demonstrated that simply being African American places men with prostate cancer at greater risk for biochemical progression after surgical treatment than men of white race — even in an equal access health care system like that of the US military. … READ MORE …