Body mass index, surgery, and risk for prostate cancer-specific death

It is well understood that there is an association between obesity and future risk for prostate cancer-specific mortality among cancer-free men. What has not been so clear is the relationship between obesity and long-term outcomes, post-treatment, among men diagnosed early with localized disease … READ MORE …

Life, behavior, and prostate cancer risk: should you be shedding a few pounds?

The capacity of the average male human to do things that are probably not very good for his health (and to not do things that probably would be good for his health) is considerable. At the most basic level, for example, most of us here in the US don’t eat very wisely and don’t take anything like enough exercise. … READ MORE …

Four (well, really six) ways you could limit your risk for lethal prostate cancer

A new paper in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute has suggested that strict adherence to a four-point healthy lifestyle may be able to lower risk for lethal forms of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Race, obesity, and risk for prostate cancer

By using data from the prospective SELECT trial (the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, conducted between 2001 and 2011), researchers have been able to suggest that obesity is strongly associated with increased risk for prostate cancer diagnosis among African American males compared to non-Hispanic whites. … READ MORE …

Metabolic aberrations and risk for prostate cancer

According to a newly published study of data from > 285,000 European males (the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project), men with metabolic aberrations are at slightly less risk for a diagnosis of prostate cancer compared with men who have normal levels of metabolic factors … but their risk for prostate cancer-specific mortality is similar. … READ MORE …

Mortality, body mass index, and Gleason score: the relationship

New data appear to suggest that you really don’t want to be diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer if you are significantly over-weight or obese. … READ MORE …

BMI correlates to risk for biochemical recurrence post-surgery

According to data presented on Tuesday at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting in Chicago, body mass index (BMI)  at the time of surgery correlates with risk for biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after first-line treatment with radical prostatectomy. … READ MORE …