New recommendations from the AUA through “Choosing Wisely” initiative

Yesterday the American Urology Association (AUA) issued a second set of five recommendations to its members through the Choosing Wisely initiative (which is coordinated by the ABIM Foundation). Two of these recommendations were specific to risk for prostate cancer and its management. … READ MORE …

Familial risk for prostate cancer ups risk for breast cancer too

Just a few days ago, a paper in Cancer reported that familial risk for breast cancer in women appeared to be affected not only by a familial history of breast cancer but also by a familial history of prostate cancer among close family members. … READ MORE …

Risk for radiation-induced second primary cancer (RTSPC) is low and may differ by radiation technique

While radiation therapy cures many cancers, many men worry that radiation-induced sub-lethal damage to healthy tissue may someday result in a second primary cancer in the irradiated field. … READ MORE …

Prediction of the “real” risk of death from prostate cancer

A while ago now we first discussed research being done by Eric Feuer and others on what was initially being called the Cancer Survival Query System or CSQS. … READ MORE …

Should pure Gleason 6 disease still be called cancer — or not?

The annual meeting of the Society for Urological Oncology has been going to in Washington, DC, this week, and reports on the various sessions have been available on the UroToday web site. … READ MORE …

The future of cancer classification — a molecular realignment

Traditionally cancers have been classified according to their organ system of origin: prostate cancer, breast cancer, color-rectal cancer, etc. For several years now, it has been evident that this historic classification system needed a major overhaul … and that overhaul is now coming closer. … READ MORE …

Who decides the “value” of a new cancer drug — and how?

In an interesting wrinkle that may profoundly impact the drug pricing debate here in America, the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has decided to “score” the value of new cancer drugs as they are brought to market. … READ MORE …

More data that will cause controversy in the screening debate

Data from a very large, 25-year-long, randomized, controlled trial of screening for cancer has cast further doubt on the value of mass, annual, population-based screening as a way to reduce cancer deaths. … READ MORE …

Other sessions from the GU Oncology Symposium on Thursday

While the late morning and afternoon oral presentations on Thursday at the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium were by no means boring, neither could any of them have been described as exactly “practice changing”. … READ MORE …

Should Gleason 6 really be called “cancer”? … A brief review

The January 15 issue of Oncology contains a review article by Lepor and Donin entitled “Gleason 6 prostate cancer: serious malignancy or toothless lion?”. … READ MORE …

The costs of new drugs to treat cancer (and other disorders)

In what is being described as “an extraordinary step” in some media reports, a group of more than 100 leukemia specialists has just published an article in the journal Blood asking for a real dialog with the biopharmaceutical industry about the constantly increasing costs associated with new (and older) drugs for the treatment of this form of cancer. … READ MORE …

How to cut your overall risk for all cancer by 51 percent, BUT …

There has been significant media coverage of a recent article in the journal Circulation. The article reports that individuals enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study were able to cut their overall risk for cancer by 51 percent. … READ MORE …

The “cure” word and its use … by oncology specialists and their patients

As many readers will be aware, the word “cure” has to be used with caution in talking about any form of cancer — prostate cancer included. While “curative” therapy can be offered to a high proportion of men diagnosed with this condition, achieving a true “cure” is a less predictable opportunity, especially for men diagnosed with intermediate- and high-risk disease. … READ MORE …

Is the word “cancer” out of date? What’s in a name?

An article in today’s New York Times (“‘Cancer’ or ‘weird cells’: which sounds deadlier?“) focuses on the question of whether many conditions currently referred to as “cancer” really are … and whether by calling them “cancer” we prejudice doctors and patients into taking overly aggressive action. … READ MORE …

Out on the frontiers of research on the genetics of cancer

For those who like to know what is happening out on the farther reaches of cancer research, there is an interesting article by George Johnson in today’s New York Times. … READ MORE …