Speed of change in the management of prostate cancer

One of our regular correspondents (who lives in England) was recently told something rather interesting by the Consultant Urologist he sees in the UK. … READ MORE …

How anxiety affects prostate cancer patients on active surveillance over time

“Anxiety” of different types is a problem associated with every diagnosis of prostate cancer. Such anxiety comes with particular implications for men implementing active surveillance as an initial management strategy after initial diagnosis with very low-, low-, or favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

A PSMA-based PET scan can change SRT decisions

The new PSMA-based PET scans provide a way to locate exactly where the cancer has spread to after an unsuccessful prostatectomy. … READ MORE …

Population-based rates of treatment for prostate cancer: 2007-2012

The population-based rate of Medicare patients getting treatment for prostate cancer dropped by 42 percent from 2007 to 2012 … but this drop did not occur in patients who had a high risk of dying from a cause other than prostate cancer within 10 years, who are arguably among those who least need immediate treatment for prostate cancer (and especially for low-risk forms of prostate cancer). … READ MORE …

Do [11C]choline PET/CT scan data change clinical decision-making?

The practical value of any type of diagnostic and prognostic technology can only really be assessed in the context of whether the data generated by that technology change the way that physicians treat (or make recommendations about treatment for) individual patients. … READ MORE …

Evolution of the mCRPC treatment landscape

A new article by Jeffress in the cancer business publication OBR Green discusses the changing patterns of use of  the various approved drugs in the treatment of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). … READ MORE …

No decrease in mortality rate of newly diagnosed men with metastatic prostate cancer

A newly published paper in the journal Cancer has indicated that, here in the USA, although overall prostate cancer mortality has declined by ~ 40 percent during the past 25 years, there has been no significant decrease in the mortality rate among men who have evident metastatic prostate cancer at time of diagnosis. … READ MORE …