Patient satisfaction at 24 months after treatment for localized prostate cancer

The ability to “manage” patients’ satisfaction with their care in the treatment of localized prostate cancer is challenging — for patients, for caregivers, for physicians, and for health systems. … READ MORE …

Patient choice and the effectiveness and safety of HIFU

An interesting article has just been published in the Journal of Urology which helps to provide information (and context) about the quality of data supporting the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Why is this debate still going on at all?

The question between different types of physician as to whether radiation therapy or surgery is “better” for the first-line, curative treatment of localized prostate cancer has now been debated (over and over) for more than 40 years. … READ MORE …

Patient preference and type of chemotherapy for mCRPC

In another presentation from the ESMO meeting in  Madrid, Spain, Fizazi et al. presented data from the randomized CABA-DOC trial  exploring patients’ preferences for either docetaxel or cabazitaxel as a first-line form of chemotherapy. … READ MORE …

Decision making and the treatment of localized prostate cancer today

This month’s issue of Urologic Oncology contains a series of six articles that may be of particular interest to prostate cancer support group leaders and other prostate cancer educators. … READ MORE …

Systematic counseling and rates of acceptance of active surveillance

According to a newly published paper in European Urology, a simple, hour-long lecture and training session can improve the ability of physicians to counsel patients systematically about active sureveillance and, at one major center, improved patient acceptance of active surveillance by as much as 17 percent. … READ MORE …

The impact of emotional distress on prostate cancer decision-making

According to a newly published paper in the Journal of Urology,

Emotional distress may motivate men with low risk prostate cancer to choose more aggressive treatment. Addressing emotional distress before and during treatment decision making may reduce a barrier to the uptake of active surveillance.

… READ MORE