The language of denial of access to high-quality prostate cancer care today

If you look at the corporate web site for eviCore Healthcare, the company describes itself as follows: … READ MORE …

What is PI-RADS and why should you care?

PI-RADS is an acronym and it stands for “prostate imaging — reporting and data system” but what it really is is a highly structured method for reporting what can be seen on certain types of prostate-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and how to interpret these data. … READ MORE …

The future of cancer classification — a molecular realignment

Traditionally cancers have been classified according to their organ system of origin: prostate cancer, breast cancer, color-rectal cancer, etc. For several years now, it has been evident that this historic classification system needed a major overhaul … and that overhaul is now coming closer. … READ MORE …

A newly proposed way to classify types of prostate cancer progression

An article by a respected group of researchers at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, published in the August issue of Cancer Discovery, proposes a new classification system for progression of prostate cancer over time. This has implications for the appropriate development and use of markers for use in treatment and drug development. … READ MORE …

Reassessment of the D’Amico classification for high-risk patients?

A group of Japanese researchers has suggested that it may be beneficial to subdivide the D’Amico “high risk” patient group into two subgroups. … READ MORE ..

The genetics of prostate cancer risk — as seen by the WSJ

There’s an article in today’s Wall Street Journal that begins, “Scientists may soon be able to answer the agonizing question facing men with prostate cancer.” The agonizing question is whether a specific individual actually needs early and aggressive treatment for his cancer or can simply monitor it for risk of progression. … READ MORE …

FRETting about how to classify cancers

FRET stands for “fluorescence resonance-energy transfer.” It’s a way to assess interactions between individual protein molecules, and allows researchers to find out how many receptors of specific types there are in a specific cancer specimen as well as how active those receptors are. … READ MORE …