This may put the cat among the pigeons!

A large, newly published, observational study has suggested that comorbidity affects other-cause mortality but not prostate cancer-specific mortality after accounting for patient and tumor characteristics and treatment type. … READ MORE …

Co-morbidity, outcome, all-cause survival, biochemical recurrence, and additional treatment

So we have all heard the commonly used phrase that men with diagnosed with prostate cancer are “more likely to die with prostate cancer than of it” — and there is certainly truth to this generalization. … READ MORE …

Regret post-treatment in men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease

Another newly published paper, this time in the British Journal of Urology, addresses issues related to cardiovascular disease and the treatment of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Are we (still) over-treating older men with localized prostate cancer?

There is good reason to believe that a very high percentage of older men — particularly those over 75 years with low-risk prostate cancer who have a life expectancy of 10 years or less — will get little to no clinical or survival benefit from active therapeutic intervention (although they should clearly be carefully monitored and given all appropriate care). … READ MORE …

Comorbidity, treatment, and mortality among Swedish prostate cancer patients

A clear appreciation of the associations between life expectancy, comorbid conditions (e.g., diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disorders), and mortality is critically important to treatment decisions for all patients with prostate cancer, but most especially the newly diagnosed, low-risk patient. … READ MORE …

Re-analysis of data from the PCLO screening study — what is truth?

A re-analysis of data from the prostate cancer screening arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colon, and Ovarian  (PLCO) cancer screening study has now stated that, “Selective use of PSA screening for men in good health appears to reduce the risk of [prostate cancer-specific mortality] with minimal overtreatment.” … READ MORE …

The value of second-line treatment for men with biochemical recurrence

Biochemical failure (also known as biochemical recurrence) after first-line treatment for prostate cancer is assessed based on a rising PSA level. This is a relatively common event and can happen shortly after first line treatment or many years later. The problem is that we really don’t know how important biochemical recurrence is in an individual patient at a specific point in time. After all, if a biochemical recurrence is never going to lead to clinical symptoms of prostate cancer (let alone prostate cancer-specific mortality), why would one want to treat it? … READ MORE …