Decision aids and prostate cancer: how useful are they?

Your sitemaster has long had concerns about the real value of decision aids in helping men to think about and come to conclusions about controversial issues in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Patient satisfaction at 24 months after treatment for localized prostate cancer

The ability to “manage” patients’ satisfaction with their care in the treatment of localized prostate cancer is challenging — for patients, for caregivers, for physicians, and for health systems. … READ MORE …

Decision aids and decision-making in prostate cancer risk

Your sitemaster has long believed that, while electronic and other decision aids can be helpful in providing men with information and education about prostate cancer, their value in helping them to make the best decisions is less clear. … READ MORE …

Don’t underestimate George Berger!

Don’t underestimate patients” is a new blog post on The Health Care Blog web site by George Berger, who is a regular commentator on the posts on this web site. … READ MORE …

The value of second opinions, and who one gets them from

An interesting new paper published this morning in Cancer has shown that while lots of men have been getting second opinions from urologists on what to do about a diagnosis of prostate cancer, those second opinions don’t seem to have had much impact on their care. … READ MORE …

Estimation of life expectancy for newly diagnosed men with prostate cancer

A critical question for every patient newly diagnosed with prostate cancer is going to be, “How long am I going to live”? That question may be particularly important if a second and associated question is, “How long am I going to live if I just monitor my cancer on active surveillance or watchful waiting?” … READ MORE …

A highly qualified “thank you” to Drs. Welch and Albertsen — maybe?

The prostate cancer patient community should be aware of an “op-ed” in today’s New York Times by Drs. Gilbert Welch and Peter Albertsen arguing that Medicare should continue to let individual physicians make their own decisions about the use of the PSA test for risk of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …