Just “delaying” surgery does increase risk … but it’s not active surveillance

A key question for men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer is always going to be whether, and for how long, they can defer treatment without increasing the risk that delayed treatment will be less effective (or riskier) in some ways. … READ MORE …

Deferred or immediate initiation of ADT in patients with PSA-only relapse

Abstracts of all papers to be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) were made available for pre-meeting review yesterday. A paper on the appropriate timing of initiation of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was featured by ASCO in its related news conference. … READ MORE …

Recent utilization of active surveillance to defer treatment in Sweden

Although many US urologists and radiation oncologists consider that active surveillance is a highly appropriate form of management for low and very low-risk forms of prostate cancer, the actual use of active surveillance in clinical practice here in the USA is still limited … so it is interesting to see recent data from Sweden on this topic. … READ MORE …

Albertsen on the problems of screening and active surveillance

A paper just published in European Urology addresses pathologic outcomes among men initially managed with active surveillance and subsequently treated by deferred radical prostatectomy (RP). The paper stimulated an important set of editorial comments by Albertsen, which we strongly recommend to readers (along with the response from the authors of the original paper). … READ MORE …

Does a 6-month delay in treatment increase risk for low-risk patients?

One of the major debates about the appropriate management of prostate cancer is whether deferral of treatment by low-risk patients is or is not associated with an increase in risk for disease progression and prostate cancer-specific mortality post-treatment. … READ MORE …

Immediate vs. deferred radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer

A retrospective analysis of data from the Swedish National Prostate Cancer Register suggests that deferring radical prostatectomy for a year or more has minimal impact on prostate cancer-specific survival for men with localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

More evidence that deferring treatment can work just fine

Concrete evidence that, for many appropriately selected men, deferred treatment may be a better choice than invasive treatment continues to accumulate. While there is still no category 1 evidence from a large, randomized clinical trial, a newly published article examined data on the management of prostate cancer patients enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study — a prospective study of 51,529 men. … READ MORE …