Personality and its impact on prostate cancer and its treatment

Your sitemaster is going to write this commentary with as much tact as he can muster but he is aware that this is going to be a very sensitive subject for some readers to deal with. … READ MORE …

Treating the psychosocial and emotional impact of prostate cancer

It doesn’t take too much reading or direct experience to realize that, to date, we haven’t been very good at meeting the needs of patients with prostate cancer — or their spouses/partners — when it comes to the sociocultural and psychological needs associated with this disorder. … READ MORE …

Mental and emotional distress among patients with cancer

A new study just published yesterday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology provides some interesting insights into the risk for various types of mental and emotional distress associated with diagnosis and treatment of cancer among > 2,100 patients with cancer interviewed according to a standardized protocol in Germany. … READ MORE …

Psychosocial distress at diagnosis and 12 months later

Every prostate cancer patient (and many patients subsequently found not to have prostate cancer) have been through the psychological and social distress associated with the risk of a diagnosis of prostate cancer. It’s no fun. … READ MORE …

Prostate cancer testing causes psychological stress in men in UK … Well, maybe (or maybe not)

Based on data from a study published recently in the British Journal of Cancer, media reports have suggested that men in the UK who undergo testing to detect prostate cancer suffer from significant psychological stress. … READ MORE …

Anxiety and distress during active surveillance

A Dutch research group has published follow-up data related to their continuing evaluation of anxiety and distress levels among men with low-risk, loocalized prostate cancer who are managed with active surveillance at their institution. … READ MORE … >

Depression in older patients with prostate cancer

There has been good evidence that older cancer patients report less “distress” than younger cancer patients. However, there has been very little research to date into the distinctions among general distress, anxiety, and depression in aging prostate cancer patients. … READ MORE …