The direct “financial toxicity” of cancer diagnosis and treatment

An interesting new paper in Cancer has offered us a sophisticated assessment of the effects of a diagnosis of and treatment for cancer on employment and income of all adults (aged 18 and older) and of adults in their  prime working years (aged from 25 and 64). … READ MORE …

How important is hanging onto your job during a recession?

There’s a new paper in an open-access journal called eCancer Medical Science that is asking a really tough question about links between unemployment and risk for prostate cancer mortality in the European Union nations. … READ MORE …

More on the costs of new cancer treatments

As some of our regular readers will be aware, a new form of cancer therapy known as “chimeric antigen receptor T-cell” therapy (often known as CART or CAR-T) is currently in advanced stages of development. … READ MORE …

Could delaying aging be beneficial to risk for prostate cancer — or not?

A new study by Goldman et al. just published in the journal Health Affairs suggests that, “Delayed aging could increase life expectancy by an additional 2.2 years, most of which would be spent in good health.” … READ MORE …

Protons and profts: the economics that drive new medical technologies today

Luke Timmerman is a nationally respected health care journalist who specializes in writing about new healthcare technologies and writes regulary for an online business web site called Xconomy.com. Recently he took a tour of the new, $152 million ProCure proton beam radiation facility in Seattle. Click here to get his take.

The cost-effectiveness of cancer therapy in America today

Luke Timmerman is a journalist who specializes in the life sciences and writes for an on-line magazine called Xconomy out on the West Coast. He is well known for writing bluntly about issues that many members of the media have little real interest in addressing. … READ MORE …

Beware what you read on billboards near your local hospital

In an article on KevinMD.com, Dr. Kelly Wright asks readers why everyone isn’t quite as excited about robot-assisted surgery as one might think they should be, given the plethora of information about the increasing use of robots in many known forms of surgery — prostate cancer included. … READ MORE …