Are African American men good candidates for active surveillance?

Data from what appears to be one of the largest registry studies to date suggest that race does not increase risk for upstaging or upgrading in men who are eligible candidates for active surveillance. … READ MORE …

Incidence, outcomes, ethnicity, and distant, de novo, metastatic prostate cancer

Diagnosis of men with distant, metastatic prostate cancer at first presentation (distant, “de novo”, metastatic prostate cancer) is a lot less common today than it was 30 or 40 years ago, but it does still happen on a regular basis. … READ MORE …

Active surveillance and African-American ethnicity

There have been reports in the recent past that active surveillance may be less appropriate for African-American men than it is for others; and then there have been reports that did not show such an effect. … READ MORE …

PSA testing among black males here in America

It is well understood that African-American men and other “black” males of African ethnic origin are at greater risk for prostate cancer (at least here in America) than are non-Hispanic “white” males. What has been less clear is whether such black males are conscious of that risk and take appropriate action. … READ MORE …

Māori men in New Zealand at greater risk than ethnic Europeans

A new study from a research group on New Zealand has again raised questions about risks from prostate cancer among men from different ethnic backgrounds, and whether these differences in risk are inherent (genetic) or related to lifestyle and other socio-economic issues. … READ MORE …

Prostate cancer incidence and mortality among men of East Asian ethnicity

Historically there has been a perception that risk for diagnosis with and death from prostate cancer among men of East Asian ethnicity was lower than that among men of European/Caucasian ethnicity. … READ MORE …

Do African Americans with low-risk prostate cancer have lower PSA density than comparable Caucasians?

There have been a number of suggestions (as yet unproven) that African American men (and perhaps other men of black African ethnicity) may be less good candidates for active surveillance than men of Caucasian and Hispanic ethnicity. … READ MORE …