A Phase III clinical trial of high-intensity exercise in the management of advanced prostate cancer

According to a news release just issued by Queen’s University, Belfast, a group of  150 researchers around the world is coming together to expand enrollment and access to the Australian INTERVAL trial into a global trial to test whether serious exercise should be prescribed as part of the treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Physical activity and prostate cancer-specific survival times

Yet another study has confirmed the benefits of regular exercise in the prevention or delay of prostate cancer-specific mortality among men with non-metastatic prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Muscle mass and fatigue in men with advanced prostate cancer

A newly published study from a Dutch research group has suggested that higher muscle mass is associated with less risk for fatigue in men with advanced prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Physical activity and cancer recurrence: a detailed review

Readers with a strong interest in the relationships between exercise and risk for cancer recurrence may want to download and read the full text of a recent article by Friedenreich et al. … READ MORE …

An update to the PrEvENT trial in England

The Prostate Cancer: Evidence of Exercise and Nutrition Trial (PrEvENT) has been ongoing in England since August 2014 and is an important and serious exploration of how diet and exercise may affect the outcomes of men who are treated for prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Yes guys … exercise is good for men on ADT!

It has long been understood that taking regular exercise can be helpful in management of risk for fatigue among men being treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer — whatever the stage of prostate cancer that the patient is being treated for. … READ MORE …

Real care beyond medical treatment, and impact on quality of life

A small, recent pilot study in Geneva, Switzerland, has shown that radiation therapy (RT) + androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) can be given safely to frail patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced or aggressive, intermediate prostate cancer, if and when a multidisciplinary care program is implemented to help such frail patients to limit risk for and manage predictable side effects. … READ MORE …