Is Problem X really a side effect of ADT, or not …?

We have long been bedeviled by questions about some of the short- and the long-term side effects and complications of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in the treatment of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

ADT and risk for cardiovascular complications of therapy

Not so long ago, we addressed the question of whether first-line androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was really an appropriate form of care for any man with localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Risk factors for primary radiation failure and timing of progression

Zumsteg et al. searched the database at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) to determine the risk factors associated with cancer progression after primary radiation treatment, and the timing of progression. They report their results in European Urology, … READ MORE …

Modes of biochemical failure after primary radiation therapy may identify aggressive sub-types

The most widely used definition of biochemical failure after primary radiation therapy is the so-called “Phoenix” definition. It’s called that because it was adopted by consensus at a meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) in Phoenix, AZ, in 2005. … READ MORE …

“Maximizing survival” for men with mCRPC after docetaxel failure

For the patient with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) there is an interesting new article (reprinted from the journal Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy) on the Medscape web site. … READ MORE …

Salvage surgery as second-line therapy after HIFU for localized prostate cancer

High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is approved in Canada for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Since its approval, this form of treatment has become popular among patients seeking a potentially curative form of treatment with low risk for complications and side effects. … READ MORE …

Understanding your clinician’s mindset about active surveillance

As one of our regular commentators constantly points out, active surveillance (AS) is not a treatment for prostate cancer. It is a means by which to manage risk for prostate cancer progression in men with low- and very low-risk disease or higher-risk disease but a limited life expectancy. … READ MORE …