Understanding better how genetic variation may affect prostate cancer risk

Previous research using so-called “genome-wide association studies” or GWAS have suggested that there may be as many as 30 different inherited prostate cancer genetic risk variants. What we don’t know much about yet is the relationships between specific genetic risk variants and the clinical outcomes of patients carrying those variants. … READ MORE …

Mixing genetic profiling with PSA data to project prostate cancer risk

There was a report on the AP news service yesterday which suggested that, “Scientists have taken a first step toward improving those problematic PSA tests for prostate cancer, by mixing in some genetic information that might help tell which men really need a biopsy.” … READ MORE …

Your genes just aren’t enough to define your risk

Writing in the July issue of Genomic Medicine, Fredrik Wiklund (an expert on the genetics of prostate cancer) states that, “[R]ecent genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous genetic variants” associated with prostate cancer. He continues by stating, … READ MORE …

Genetic markers for prostate cancer in Japanese patients

A large study of genetic markers in Japanese prostate cancer patients has clearly shown that some of the markers of prostate cancer in Caucasians do not appear in Japanese patients whereas new markers appear to be common among Japanese. … READ MORE …

Genetic testing for prostate cancer “in the real world”

Over the past few months, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a slew of letters to companies marketing tests designed to provide consumers with information about their genetic profile and their risks for certain types of disease. … READ MORE …

The genetics of prostate cancer risk — as seen by the WSJ

There’s an article in today’s Wall Street Journal that begins, “Scientists may soon be able to answer the agonizing question facing men with prostate cancer.” The agonizing question is whether a specific individual actually needs early and aggressive treatment for his cancer or can simply monitor it for risk of progression. … READ MORE …

Is there a link between genetics, selenium, and prostate cancer risk?

A new article in Cancer Prevention Research not only suggests the possibility that there is a very real association between selenium levels in serum after all, but it also helps to explain why this association may not have shown up in the large, double-blind, and randomized SELECT trial. … READ MORE …

More genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

Two new papers published on line in Nature Genetics have added a total of nine more genetic variants to the number of variants associated with an increased risk for prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

What our genes aren’t telling us … yet!

An  important paper has just been published by a highly respected team of specialists doing research into the role of genetic variations in assessment of risk for prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Friday’s news and reports: December 26, 2008

With at least a dozen new reports available today, we have chosen to focus only on the most significant, several of which may be of clinical importance now or in the near future. Most of the other items provide minimal new information and can be accessed through the UroToday web site by those who are interested. … READ MORE …

Link between heredity and prostate cancer survival times in Sweden

So it appears that prostate cancer survival (and not just risk for prostate cancer) runs in families — at least in Sweden!

There have been multiple studies designed to look at risk for prostate cancer based on familial history. And while family history is a known risk factor for prostate cancer, its effect on survival has not been clear at all. However, a study just published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology seems to show that “good and poor survival [times] in prostate cancer aggregate in families.” In other words (just as an example), if a father has prostate cancer and his cancer progresses quickly, then if his sons also get prostate cancer they are also at risk for a more aggressive form of the disease! The authors suggest that, in fact, factors governing survival in prostate cancer may be different from those governing risk for prostate cancer. This is certainly a novel concept. … MORE