Howard Wolinsky takes another step on his active surveillance travels

In his latest post on the MedPage Today web site, Howard Wolinsky (a freelance journalist based in the Chicago area), who has been on active surveillance since 2010, writes about the result of his most recent rebiopsy. His last one was in 2013. There was (again) “no evidence of malignancy” in the post-biopsy pathology report. … READ MORE …

Not all men with Gleason 8-10 disease are going to do badly after treatment

There is a perception among a lot of patients — especially when they get diagnosed — that having a high Gleason score of 8, 9, or 10 is essentially a “death sentence”, regardless of how they get treated. … READ MORE …

“HG-PIN alone should not be an indication for further biopsies” in the PSA era

A podium presentation by Kingman et al. at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) may be among the most significant to be presented at the meeting. It seriously challenges the long-held belief about the need to routinely re-biopsy men initially diagnosed with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN). … READ MORE …

The clinical significance of high-grade PIN — an update

A newly published mini-review in BJU International deals with the biologic and clinical significance of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN) as a sole finon an initial biopsy for risk of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Selenium, vitamin E, soy, and prostate cancer prevention

A new Canadian study just reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology has failed to find any significant benefit from the use of vitamin E, selenium, and soy protein supplements in the prevention of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

High-grade PIN and risk for clinically significant prostate cancer: an update

Work by Bostwick and his colleagues (long before the development of Bostwick Laboratories) first showed a clear association between an initial diagnosis of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN) and subsequent risk for a diagnosis of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Multifocal, high-grade, prostatic epithelial neoplasia and prostate cancer risk

The presence of high-grade, prostatic epithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN) — in the absence of either prostate cancer or atypia (ASAP) — on an initial biopsy has long been associated with risk for a subsequent diagnosis of cancer. … READ MORE …