Family history, PSA testing, and risk for diagnosis with prostate cancer

A presentation at the ongoing annual meeting of the European Association of Urology (EAU), in London, England, has reported (perhaps unsurprisingly) that PSA testing for risk of prostate cancer based on family history alone is not a very good idea. … READ MORE …

Informed patient counseling and the effect on PSA testing

We know that a family history of prostate cancer and the presence of certain genetic/genomic markers are associated with increased risk for prostate cancer in general and for some types of clinically significant prostate cancer in particular. … READ MORE …

Refining knowledge about familial risk for prostate cancer

We have known for years that if your father or your brother is diagnosed with prostate cancer, it affects your own risk for prostate cancer … but what sorts of prostate cancer are we talking about? Aggressive, indolent, metastatic, localized, what? … READ MORE …

Clinical and therapeutic histories of men who actually die of mCRPC

Despite all the prostate cancer research over the past 30 or so years, we still have limited information about the clinical and therapeutic history of prostate cancer in men who have progressive disease and go on to die of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). … READ MORE …

Family history and screening for prostate cancer: no evidence of benefit

In what we believe to be the first report of its kind from anywhere in the world, a new paper has reported that there seems to be no evidence that selective screening of men with a family history of prostate cancer is clinically beneficial compared to men with no family history of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Does smoking history predict PSA levels in a clinically significant manner?

A new paper published on line in the Journal of Urology suggests that the PSA and %free PSA levels of current smokers and former smokers may be statistically significantly impacted compared to those of men who have very rarely or never smoked.

Impact of ADT on all-cause mortality in men treated with brachytherapy-based radiation therapy

The addition of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to radiation therapy for men with localized prostate cancer is common. It may be used to reduce the size of the prostate prior to brachytherapy or for longer periods in men with higher risk disease to extend survival (which has been demonstrated in large-scale, randomized, multi-center clinical trials). … READ MORE …