Prostate cancer projections for 2018

The American Cancer Society (ACS) has just announced its annual projections for cancer incidence and mortality rates for 2018. … READ MORE …

Prostate cancer statistics in America, 2017

As it does every year, the American Cancer Society (ACS) has just published it’s annual update cancer statistics update: Cancer Facts & Figures 2017. Those who are interested are of course welcome to peruse this detailed document for themselves. What follows is a quick summary of the prostate cancer-related data in the ACS update. … READ MORE …

Prostate cancer-specific mortality within the US VA medical system

A newly published article in the journal Frontiers in Oncology suggests that men diagnosed with prostate cancer at ≥ 70 years of age may be more likely to die of their prostate cancer than younger men, regardless of their PSA level at diagnosis. … READ MORE …

That “rise” in the incidence of metastatic prostate cancer

Well … Don’t say we didn’t warn you. The American Cancer Society (ACS) and others are now saying that the study suggesting a rise in the incidence of metastatic prostate cancer from 2004 to 2013 has serious flaws. … READ MORE …

The incidence of prostate cancer in Africa

Our knowledge about the true incidence of prostate cancer in Africa is still extremely limited. But we know that the risk for prostate cancer among men of African ancestry in the Caribbean and in the Americas is much higher that that of men of European ancestry. … READ MORE …

Biopsy rates have fallen; but biopsy complication rates have risen!

A newly published article in European Urology has raised a new issue that should be of significant concern to urologists (and to their patients) in relation to risks associated with the possibility of diagnosis of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Just how real are the annual ACS estimates for risk associated with prostate cancer?

One has to be a very sophisticated statistician to understand how the American Cancer Society (ACS) comes up with its annual estimates for the numbers of people who will get diagnosed with and die of each specific form of cancer in any particular year. (And your sitemaster freely admits that he is not a sophisticated statistician.) … READ MORE …