Different types of surgery for high-risk disease … outcomes at Johns Hopkins

In the context of the current question about “problems” with the da Vinci robot (previously addressed today), we have some new data from Johns Hopkins on the outcomes of men with high-risk, localized prostate cancer, treated using open, retropubic (ORP), non-robot-assisted laparoscopic (LRP), and robot-assisted laparoscopic (RALP) forms of radical prostatectomy. … READ MORE …

Risk for eye injuries associated with RALP for prostate cancer

One might reasonably be pardoned for not being able to imagine how having a radical prostatectomy with robot assistance (a robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy or RALP) could possibly be associated with eye injuries, given the relative lack of proximity of the organs concerned. … READ MORE …

Continence and sexual function after RALP as opposed to LRP

A paper just published in European Urology claims that prostate cancer patients treated with robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) recover continence and sexual function faster than those treated with non-robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (LRP). … READ MORE …

RALP not associated with better continence, sexual function after prostate cancer surgery

The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink has long been pointing out the lack of any evidence that men who are treated with robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) will have better outcomes with respect to continence and sexual function than men who elect to have the older, “open” form of radical prostatectomy. … READ MORE …

Robot-assisted surgery is not necessarily better than open surgery

As we regularly point out, outcomes after surgery for prostate cancer are massively impacted by the skill, the experience, and the focus of the surgeon. The tools he or she uses to carry out the surgery may or may not be a factor. We simply do not really know. … READ MORE …

A new way to look at side effects of first-line prostate cancer treatment

Academic research into the side effects of different treatments for localized prostate cancer have long been hampered by the lack of consistently used criteria for the assessment of those side effects at baseline and at defined time-periods post-treatment. … READ MORE …

How surgeons and patients think about post-surgical incontinence

We are coming to the conclusion that there is a deep divide between how some surgeons think about post-surgical incontinence following radical prostatectomy for their prostate cancer and how patients may think about such incontinence when defined by exactly the same set of clinical symptoms and quality of life issues. … READ MORE …