New review of current practice in use of LHRH receptor agonists and antagonists

The full text of a recent review on the use of LHRH receptor agonists (e.g., leuprolide acetate, goserelin acetate) asnd LHRH receptor antagonists (e.g., degarelix) has recently been published by Shore et al. in Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. The full text of the article is also available on line on the Medscape Oncology web site.

Long-term LHRH receptor agonist therapy and risk for biliary disease

A study just published in European Urology suggests that — in  addition to all the other side effects associated with LHRH receptor agonist therapy — such therapy also induces a small but statistically significant increase in risk for biliary disease. … READ MORE …

New ADT patients not well informed about possible side effects

The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink is utterly unsurprised to learn about a forthcoming paper demonstrating that many men starting treatment with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) — and their partners — are significantly under-informed about the risk for side effects and adverse effects associated with such therapy. … READ MORE …

Phase IIb trial of ozarelix — a new LHRH receptor antagonist

According to a corporate media release, a company called Spectrum Pharmaceuticals has initiated enrollment of an additional 150 patients into a Phase IIb trial of a new LHRH receptor antagonist called ozarelix (a drug with a similar mechanism of action to degarelix or Firmagon) for the treatment of advanced forms of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Is an LHRH antagonist a better first-line hormone therapy than an LHRH agonist?

The question of whether an LHRH antagonist (such as degarelix) is really a better first-line hormone therapy than an LHRH agonist (e.g., leuprolide acetate) is still not fully answered. … READ MORE …

Degarelix as second-line ADT in men not responsive to LHRH agonist therapy

First-line androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for a man with metastatic prostate cancer has long been been either surgical or medical castration. In the case of medical castatration, the form of medication most commonly used since the mid to late 1980s has been an LHRH agonist (e.g., leuprolide acetate). … READ MORE …

Delayed onset of castration resistance with serum T-based LHRH agonist regimens

A new paper just published online in Urology suggests that intermittent and testosterone (T)-based LHRH regimens are less likely to be associated with early onset of castration resistance than traditional, continuous, calender-based regimens. … READ MORE …