Does radical prostatectomy really extend life … at least in Denmark?

A newly published paper in the Scandinavian Journal of Urology comes to the potentially controversial conclusion that “the gain in life expectancy” after surgical treatment by radical prostatectomy “is minimal” for Danish men with prostate cancer compared to the life expectancy of Danish men in general. … READ MORE …

Over-treatment of older men with life expectancies < 10 years

According to a paper newly published in Cancer, “Men aged < 80 years at diagnosis who have life expectancies < 10 years often receive aggressive treatment for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer, mostly with radiation therapy.” … READ MORE …

Clinical use of nomograms and other tools in prostate cancer counseling and prognosis

Clinical guidelines from such organizations as the American Urological Association (AUA) and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) call for measures designed to improve quality of care and facilitate better treatment decisions for men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer. The degree to which this really happens, however, is not well understood. … READ MORE …

The man who wishes he’d never had the PSA test he demanded

There is an interesting article on Kaiser Health News today discussing the risks associated with “over-testing” of elderly and sometimes very infirm people who are at relatively low risk for specific chronic diseases, including prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

PSA testing in men over 70 years of age — some perspective

A new report in the Journal of Clinical Oncology suggests that — at least between 2000 and 2005 — “excessive PSA screening in elderly men with limited life expectancies” was a significant problem, and may remain so today. … READ MORE …

Health, life expectancy, and management choices for men with localized prostate cancer

When men are initially diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, they face numerous management options — including watchful waiting and active surveillance under appropriate circumstances. In general, physicians tend to recommend treatment if the patient’s reasonable life expectancy is 10 years or more. … READ MORE …

Modeling the life expectancy benefits of active surveillance

An article in today’s issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the accompanying editorial in the same issue, are getting a lot of media attention — despite the fact that the article is “only” a mathematical analysis of the possible quality of life benefits of active surveillance in low-risk patients compared to active intervention. … READ MORE …