Can a company patent a human gene? The showdown comes on Monday!

Next Monday, after conflicting rulings in other courts over the past 4 years, the case of Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics will be fought out before the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS). At stake is the complex issue of exactly what is patentable related to the isolation and use of portions of the human genome (and other, related issues). … READ MORE …

Gene patenting issue to be addressed by Supreme Court

As regular readers may remember, The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink has been keeping an eye on the court case known as the Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. The case relates to the rights of the biotechnology industry (or indeed any other organization or individual) to hold patents on human genes and/or their scientific uses. … READ MORE …

Should it be possible to patent specific genes?

As we have previously discussed, the question posed above is a highly controversial one, and there is a legal case in the U.S. — the case challenging Myriad Genetics ownership of patents on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for specific types of breast cancer — which has now reached the Supreme Court (sometimes called SCOTUS by Washington insiders). … READ MORE …

Of genes and patents and Myriad Genetics

In March 2010, as previously reported on this web site, a federal court judge initially ruled that the patents on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes held by Myriad Genetics and the University of Utah “are directed to a law of nature and were therefore improperly granted.” … READ MORE …