Survival of men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer

There has been regular discussion here and elsewhere about the degree to which new forms of therapy have impacted patient survival since the original approval of docetaxel for treatment of metastatic, castration-resistant  prostate cancer (mCRPC). … READ MORE …

Men initially diagnosed with de novo metastatic prostate cancer are living longer

A newly published study entitled “Improved cancer-specific free survival and overall free survival in contemporary metastatic prostate cancer patients: a population-based study” is important … but needs to be interpreted with a significant degree of caution. … READ MORE …

Contemporary rates of overall and prostate cancer-specific mortality in Norway

A newly published study in the journal Urology (“the Gold journal”) has reported data on risk of death from prostate cancer and other causes among > 3,000 contemporary patients diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer in 2004-2005. … READ MORE …

Metastasis-free survival as a surrogate endpoint in prostate cancer clinical trials

As many readers will have realized, the major regulatory authorities started, some time ago, to accept prostate cancer progression-free survival of differing types as a surrogate for overall survival in the approval of some drugs for the treatment of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Nuts to the Daily Telegraph … and nuts for most of our readers!

Finally, we may have the perfect paper that illustrates the critical difference between overall mortality rates and cancer-specific cancer rates among men with prostate cancer, and how affecting one may have no effect whatsoever on the other! … READ MORE …

What does a very high PSA at diagnosis tell us?

Probably because of high level of research funding as a consequence of the Movember Foundation‘s initiatives, Australia is increasingly providing us with interesting data on the diagnosis, management, and outcomes of men with prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Statin use and all-cause mortality among prostate cancer patients

Yet another study involving a large number of patients (this one from Taiwan) has again concluded that men with prostate cancer who take statins are less likely to die within a definable time period than men with prostate cancer who are not taking statins. … READ MORE …