ASCO issues guidelines on physician-patient communication

Your sitemaster is uncertain whether to feel delighted or seriously concerned by the fact that the American Society for Medical Oncology (ASCO) has decided to issue guidelines for its members on how to communicate with patients. … READ MORE …

Treating the psychosocial and emotional impact of prostate cancer

It doesn’t take too much reading or direct experience to realize that, to date, we haven’t been very good at meeting the needs of patients with prostate cancer — or their spouses/partners — when it comes to the sociocultural and psychological needs associated with this disorder. … READ MORE …

Physician-patient relationships in the management of cancer

Many readers might want to know of and read an article by Richard Wassersug entitled “Common courtesy can humanize cancer care“, which you can find on the web site of The Conversation. … READ MORE …

How primary care physicians could better help prostate cancer patients

A newly published article on the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine offers some helpful guidance to primary care  physicians on the subject of prostate cancer diagnosis and its management. … READ MORE …

“Please include more patients at our medical meetings”

Apparently Howard Wolinsky’s participation as a patient in the active surveillance panel at the Genitourinary Cancer Symposium last month “hit a nerve” with at least one of the medical oncologists in the audience. … READ MORE …

And now for an update from Howard Wolinsky

Prostate Cancer International is very proud to have been part (through PCPC3) of helping to have a patient participate in the very first session of the recent Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando, Florida (which was all about active surveillance and its application). … READ MORE …

Why language is important in prostate cancer management

We have emphasized this before, but we want to talk about it again because it recently came up in a general primary care journal: “active surveillance” and “watchful waiting” are often used interchangeably — by patients and their partners and by some doctors too … but they aren’t the same thing at all. … READ MORE …