How many “different” types of prostate cancer are there?

This, of course, is a rhetorical question. We really have no good idea how many “different” types of prostate cancer there are. And so what we are really dealing with here is how we are going to sub-classify prostate cancers in the future in order to treat them most appropriately at the earliest relevant stage of development. … READ MORE …

Genetic profiling and the future management of prostate cancer

A recent review article from Future Oncology, just posted in full on the Medscape Oncology web site, addresses the evolving topic of how we can translate our knowledge about genetic risk factors for prostate cancer into practical processes that can be used routinely by clinicians. … READ MORE …

The real clinical utility of tests like Prolaris and Oncotype DX in management of prostate cancer

Regular readers (and others) who are interested in gaining more understanding of the potential clinical utility of the new, gene-based prognostic tests for the management of localized prostate cancer will be interested in reading a new article on the Medscape Oncology web site. … READ MORE …

114-candidate gene panel can detect nearby prostate cancer in stromal prostate tissue

There has been a lot of media “chatter” over the past 3 days about an article published in the journal Cancer Research. The article suggests that an investigational genetic test can project the presence of prostate cancer in biopsy-based specimens with an average accuracy of 97 percent. … READ MORE …

Multi-gene profiling can lower need for prostate biopsies, but …

One of the problems with the PSA test is that it identifies a possible risk for prostate cancer in many men each year who are subsequently shown — by prostate biopsy — to be at no risk for the actual clinical condition. … READ MORE …

Mixing genetic profiling with PSA data to project prostate cancer risk

There was a report on the AP news service yesterday which suggested that, “Scientists have taken a first step toward improving those problematic PSA tests for prostate cancer, by mixing in some genetic information that might help tell which men really need a biopsy.” … READ MORE …

The genetics of prostate cancer risk — as seen by the WSJ

There’s an article in today’s Wall Street Journal that begins, “Scientists may soon be able to answer the agonizing question facing men with prostate cancer.” The agonizing question is whether a specific individual actually needs early and aggressive treatment for his cancer or can simply monitor it for risk of progression. … READ MORE …