Nuts to the Daily Telegraph … and nuts for most of our readers!

Finally, we may have the perfect paper that illustrates the critical difference between overall mortality rates and cancer-specific cancer rates among men with prostate cancer, and how affecting one may have no effect whatsoever on the other! … READ MORE …

What does a very high PSA at diagnosis tell us?

Probably because of high level of research funding as a consequence of the Movember Foundation‘s initiatives, Australia is increasingly providing us with interesting data on the diagnosis, management, and outcomes of men with prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Can a regular aspirin regimen extend survival of men with prostate cancer?

Another intriguing paper to be presented this week at the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium suggests an association between regular aspirin intake and risk for lethal prostate cancer among men already diagnosed with prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Are prostate cancer-specific mortality rates in Australia higher than they should be?

An article just published in the World Journal of Urology has suggested that rates of prostate cancer-specific mortality in Australia seem to have been unexpectedly higher than in the USA. … READ MORE …

Does regular aspirin therapy improve survival of prostate cancer patients?

An open-access, full text article in the April issue of the Journal of Urology addresses long-standing questions about the impact of regular aspirin use on the long-term outcomes of men diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer. … READ MORE

Non-prostate cancer-specific mortality rates in a cohort of > 3,000 patients

The issue of how long a man who is newly diagnosed with localized prostate cancer is likely to live before he dies a natural death from other causes is a crucial element in the decision whether to undergo treatment (and how aggressive that treatment may need to be). … READ MORE …

Badly judged and biased political spin from the European Association for Urology

According to a media release issued by the European Association of Urology on Saturday, just prior to the opening of their annual meeting in Milan, Italy, “Surgery is superior to radiotherapy in men with localized [prostate cancer].” This headline is not even justifiable based on the content of the media release. … READ MORE …