Sexual function after prostate cancer treatment in the MSM community

There is a significant knowledge gap concerning sexual function for prostate cancer patients in the men who have sex with men (MSM) community, because all of the existing assessment tools are designed for the heterosexual population. … READ MORE …

Chance and progress in the treatment of cancer

Those readers who have limited knowledge of how “translational research” often occurs and progresses (or fails) — particularly in the field of cancer therapy — might like to read this article by Rosenbaum in this week’s issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. … READ MORE …

The evolution of evaluation of risk for clinically significant prostate cancer

Whatever one may happen to think about the value of the PSA test, we all know that it is very bad at actually telling a doctor or a patient if that patient is at real risk for clinically significant prostate cancer. So, from that perspective … READ MORE …

More about screening … current and future issues

So there are two new articles recently published on the prostate cancer screening issue. One deals with the numbers of men  in America who seem to be getting screened today. The other addresses whether there should be different guidance on prostate cancer screening for African Americans as opposed to “the rest of us” (Caucasians, Hispanics, and “white” Americans). … READ MORE …

Videos from the 2017 APCCC in St. Gallen, Switzerland

The Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference was held in St. Gallen, Switzerland, on March 9 to 11, and there are a series of video interviews about some of the presentations now available on the UroToday web site … READ MORE …

Another research team, and another micro-RNA …

Last week we mentioned that one specific form of micro-ribonucleic acid (miRNA) may be usable in the development of a drug or drugs to stop the process of metastasis in men with high-risk forms of prostate cancer. Another recent study goes one step further than that. … READ MORE …

A better way to grow prostate cancer cells in the lab

In a very interesting research development, a group at Georgetown University here in the US has finally found a way to be able to extract and grow the normal and cancerous prostate cells from individual patients in the laboratory and then implant them into mice. … READ MORE …