On active and proactive surveillance

Once upon a time (and not so long ago) newly diagnosed men with some types of prostate cancer used to think your sitemaster was out of his tiny mind when he would suggest to them that they might be wise to just monitor their situation rather than rush into treatment. … READ MORE …

Two leading women talk about the future of treatment of advanced prostate cancer

Nearly 30 years ago, when your sitemaster first attended a prostate cancer meeting (in 1989) related to the upcoming approval of a new drug called flutamide, he doesn’t remember there being a single clinician at the meeting who was female — out of the 150 or so urologists and medical oncologists who had been invited. … READ MORE …

Congress approves $100 million in prostate cancer research funding through DoD

When it passed the Omnibus appropriations bill for the financial year 2018 at the end of last week, Congress increased funding for prostate cancer research from $80 to $100 million through the Department of Defense’s Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program (CDRMP). … READ MORE …

Broad Institute launches the Metastatic Prostate Cancer Project

Last May we had told you about an initiative at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, designed — initially —  to generate a comprehensive database of advanced prostate cancer treatment results based on the genetics of individual patients and their tumors. … READ MORE …

Sexual function after prostate cancer treatment in the MSM community

There is a significant knowledge gap concerning sexual function for prostate cancer patients in the men who have sex with men (MSM) community, because all of the existing assessment tools are designed for the heterosexual population. … READ MORE …

Chance and progress in the treatment of cancer

Those readers who have limited knowledge of how “translational research” often occurs and progresses (or fails) — particularly in the field of cancer therapy — might like to read this article by Rosenbaum in this week’s issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. … READ MORE …

The evolution of evaluation of risk for clinically significant prostate cancer

Whatever one may happen to think about the value of the PSA test, we all know that it is very bad at actually telling a doctor or a patient if that patient is at real risk for clinically significant prostate cancer. So, from that perspective … READ MORE …