But annual, mass, population-based PSA screening really works (or does it?)

A new and potentially controversial article in Urology (the “Gold Journal”) has just suggested that regular, mass, population-based screening of men for risk of prostate cancer every 12 to 18 months remains a good idea. … READ MORE …

Gallium-68 PET/CT scans prior to first-line treatment of some men with prostate cancer

A newly-reported set of data from an Australian clinical research team has now shown that 68Ga PSMA PET/CT scans changed the staging and the management of men after initial diagnosis and prior to first-line treatment compared to traditional CT and bone scanning. … READ MORE …

It’s Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, again …

… and during Prostate Cancer Awareness Month men and their families are regularly subjected to messaging about the importance of getting “screened” for risk of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Did you get an MRI scan as part of your clinical work-up for prostate cancer risk?

A report in the journal Urology (the so-called “Gold Journal”) from a team of researchers at Yale School of Medicine has shown that having a prostate MRI as part of the work-up for a patient initially diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer roughly doubled the chance that such a patient was initially managed on “observation”. … READ MORE …

Understanding the genetics of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment

For those who are interested in this evolving topic, we recommend listening to Dr. Charles Ryan’s 16-minute-long discussion with Heather Cheng, MD, PhD, entitled “Genetic evaluation and counseling in prostate cancer treatment”. … READ MORE …

Early data from the PROPS imaging trial prior to SRT

A recent presentation by Pouliot Frederick, MD, at the annual meeting of the Canadian Urological Association in Halifax, Nova Scotia, provided information on the roles of multiparametric MRI, [18F]choline, and 86Ga-PSMA PET/CT scans in determining the utility and value of salvage radiation therapy (SRT) for patients progressing after first-line surgery. … READ MORE …

Salvage radiation dose: decision-making under uncertainty

A large, well-done, confirmed, randomized clinical trial (RCT) is the only evidence that proves that one therapy is better than other. According to current consensus, this is deemed “Level 1a” evidence. But this high level of evidence is seldom available. … READ MORE …